Updated on:Jan 11 , 2021

Jan 11- New Refresh added to News sect. 

Jan 11 - New items added to Shop sect.

Jan 7 - New Refresh added to Kokuu - Nahiko sect.

My thoughts and Inspirations on Life and Pottery Love. 

Refined work shodo (書 道) by the master calligrapher Ougai Kofude (小 筆 凰 外) depicting an enso (円 相), or a circle. The meaning is perhaps the most common subject that symbolizes enlightenment, strength, the universe. It is believed by many that the artist's nature is fully revealed by the way he draws this circle; furthermore it is believed that only those who are mentally and spiritually complete can draw a true enso. Some artists draw an enso every day, as a kind of spiritual diary.

Some draw the meaning with an opening in the circle, while others complement it. The opening could symbolize that this circle is not separate from the rest of things but is part of something larger. The enso is a sacred symbol in Zen Buddhism, and is often used by Zen masters as a signature in their works.

What is Enso?
It is said to be the symbol of Buddism and the universe, but each interpretation is free. There is no correct answer. When u see the hanging scroll of enso, u can feel "peace" "earth" and "no eternity".
"No eternity" is the basic idea of ​​Buddhism.
The flowers bloom beautifully, but it finished around autumn
The good and the bad things are not eternal.
There are many things in life,
So that good things are not eternal
Bad things don't last forever.
Like the flowers bloom again
So that spring will come again after winter
Happiness comes after painful things.
☺️🙏

Kohei Tanaka 

Yuuka Matsuo Kyusu Tea Pot

Kanji Kato Shino White
Kanji Kato Shino White
ONI HAGI "YAMAGUCHI TREASURE"
ONI HAGI "YAMAGUCHI TREASURE"
 Photo by: Akihiko Tsukigata
Photo by: Akihiko Tsukigata

赤陽の美濃 Red Sunlight in Mino 

Ikigai: the Japanese answer to a life of purpose
Ikigai: the Japanese answer to a life of purpose
☆   Wind Blowing Down from Mount Fuji☆
☆ Wind Blowing Down from Mount Fuji☆

Special  Akira Selected as  1th of the 9th Bowl available at "one" exhibit located in ichifu: japan

≪9th Bowl of the Gallery ONE Exhibition≫
November 1st-November 30th  

Nakamura II
Nakamura II
☆ KATO Yoshihiko ☆
☆ KATO Yoshihiko ☆

Most of his chawan have a rounded or cylindrical (tsutsu-gata) form and an air of quiet dignity. Their organic forms are not pretentious or proud. It's their simple nobility and honesty that draws the viewer in. A good chawan seems to "ask" to be used, and all of Yoshida's works do. The delicate pastel colors and the inviting lips of his chawan beg to be held in almost a sensual way. 

Comes from a notable family of Nishiura ware from the Mino kiln. Kato Keizan of celadon is his uncle. Also related to the Myoken kiln of Karatsu ware. Researched site of old kilns across Japan. Later studied under Tsukigata Nahiko. Became independent in 1974. Works focus on Shino ware, Setoguro ware, and Kizeto ware. 
Yamada Kazu
Yamada Kazu
Kato Toyohisa
Kato Toyohisa

Molten blu green rises magnificently from the thick frosting of white by Kato Toyohisa enclosed in the original signed wooden box. The colour beauty periodically dividing the thick glaze and drifts of white on the sides of this tea bowl lend a sense of pleasant silky touch in hand, making the bowl seem a majestic glance. It is like to stay at the feet of a glacier of pure white coloured snow, islandic geisyr escaping the molten earth through the sublime surface. 

★Shiho Kanzaki & the Soil and Flame Reincarnated Mysterious Rise of the Greatest Potter in Japan ★

Rise! Kanzaki Shiho \The Legend!
Rise! Kanzaki Shiho \The Legend!
DONATE
DONATE

Ken Jeremiah \ Available Now \ The Forthcoming New Book \ Chadogu the Art of Tea 

Long acclaimed one of the Best Book 2020 - The Cha-no-Yu, or Tea Ceremony - an aesthetic ritual intimately linked to Zen and Daoism. Its history reveals a comingling of Chinese and Japanese cultures that is not only a symbol of the complex interplay between Sino-Japanese ideas of beauty, but also the epitome of both Zen and ancient Daoist ideals: "being" in the world and understanding the inner nature of things. An appreciation of the imperfect, the asymmetrical teahouses, unpretentious bamboo ladles and scoops, and famed tea bowls may seem flawed to untrained eyes, perhaps lacking something. However, it is this perceived void that eager participants strive to identify, for usefulness arises from emptiness, just as perfection is found within imperfection. Among all the utensils used in the tea ceremony, the bowl plays the most active role.  

Ken Jeremiah

Tamaoki Yasuo  Winner of numerous awards and hailed as an Important Intangible Cultural Property of Tajimi City and Gifu Prefecture, both historical centers of Japanese pottery, his works epitomize the beauty of Shino. A high-temperature-fired style of pottery, it often has small nesting holes (suana) that tea ceremony aficionados adore. This characteristic, combined with a yuzuhada (citron skin) finish and a milky glaze made from feldspar, makes Shino one of the most beautiful ceramic methodologies on the planet. Tamaoki's pieces are the culmination of years of stylistic advancement. Creating red and white pieces with iron-colored, ashen clay decorated with thick, beautiful white or reddish glaze, his valuable works are highly praised.  Brief introduction is written for Onihagi web site & is only courtesy of Dr. Ken Jeremiah
Tamaoki Yasuo Winner of numerous awards and hailed as an Important Intangible Cultural Property of Tajimi City and Gifu Prefecture, both historical centers of Japanese pottery, his works epitomize the beauty of Shino. A high-temperature-fired style of pottery, it often has small nesting holes (suana) that tea ceremony aficionados adore. This characteristic, combined with a yuzuhada (citron skin) finish and a milky glaze made from feldspar, makes Shino one of the most beautiful ceramic methodologies on the planet. Tamaoki's pieces are the culmination of years of stylistic advancement. Creating red and white pieces with iron-colored, ashen clay decorated with thick, beautiful white or reddish glaze, his valuable works are highly praised. Brief introduction is written for Onihagi web site & is only courtesy of Dr. Ken Jeremiah
Kumano Kuroemon  Some of the most valuable pieces are made by the enigmatic Kumano Kuroemon. Reclusive, he lives in the mountains near Echizen, Fukui Prefecture, where he has his own private kiln. Yearly, he scours the surrounding mountains for suitable clay, which he shapes into incredible bowls, vases, and more. After applying his own glaze variation, he fires them at an incredible 1520 degrees Celsius, often foregoing sleep for an entire week to constantly regulate the heat.  Most artists would not think of firing a piece at such a high temperature, as it would cause pieces to buckle, distend, or lose their solidity.  Brief introduction is written for Onihagi web site & is only courtesy of Dr. Ken Jeremiah
Kumano Kuroemon Some of the most valuable pieces are made by the enigmatic Kumano Kuroemon. Reclusive, he lives in the mountains near Echizen, Fukui Prefecture, where he has his own private kiln. Yearly, he scours the surrounding mountains for suitable clay, which he shapes into incredible bowls, vases, and more. After applying his own glaze variation, he fires them at an incredible 1520 degrees Celsius, often foregoing sleep for an entire week to constantly regulate the heat. Most artists would not think of firing a piece at such a high temperature, as it would cause pieces to buckle, distend, or lose their solidity. Brief introduction is written for Onihagi web site & is only courtesy of Dr. Ken Jeremiah

"Remnants of a Distant Past"

Brief introduction is written for Onihagi web site &  courtesy of Dr. Ken Jeremiah 

Ken Jeremiah has written numerous books and articles, and he has translated various works from Spanish, Italian, and Japanese. Dr. Ken Jeremiah has written extensively about history, religion, and critical thinking. His previous books include Remnants of a Distant Past, Christian Mummification, Living Buddhas, Aikido Ground Fighting, and If the Samurai Played Golf...Zen Strategies for a Winning Game. He teaches world language and comparative religion courses, and currently resides in Narragansett, RI. 

Kawasaki Daishi Heikenji Temple Omamori

The omamori are Japanese amulets dedicated both to particular Shinto deities and to Buddhist icons. The Japanese word mamori means protection, while the honorific prefix o- gives the word a moving meaning towards the outside, thus going to mean "Your protection".

Traffic safety guard (omamori bag)  Kanji character of "traffic safety" 交通安全御守
Traffic safety guard (omamori bag) Kanji character of "traffic safety" 交通安全御守

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