ORDER & RELAX. WE WILL SHIP ON 24 AUGUST
ORDER & RELAX. WE WILL SHIP ON 24 AUGUST

Updated on: August 14, 2020

August 14 - New Refresh added to News sect. 

August 14 - New items added to Shop sect.

August 9 - Interview added to Chotto sect.

August 2 - New items added to 5 Senses sect.

July 31 New Theme added to Home sect. 

July 23 New 50% Outlet added Clearance Sale Shop sect. 

ORDER & RELAX. WE WILL SHIP ON 24 AUGUST
ORDER & RELAX. WE WILL SHIP ON 24 AUGUST
Open Hours from 24th August 2020\2021
Open Hours from 24th August 2020\2021

At Dobrá čajovna Art exhibition
July\Sept 2020
 Praha VN - Václavské náměstí 14, 11000 Prague, Czech Republic

Vrastiak”s Dobrá čajovna Art exhibition July\Sept 2020. Special Ambassador Art Exhibition Veronika Robotkova (MISS NISEKO HOKKAIDO 2020)
Vrastiak”s Dobrá čajovna Art exhibition July\Sept 2020. Special Ambassador Art Exhibition Veronika Robotkova (MISS NISEKO HOKKAIDO 2020)
Kaneta Masanao
Kaneta Masanao

The 72 climates of Hideyuki

Seventy-two weathers in Japan, which match the climate of Japan, represent changes in flora and fauna and weather in seventy-two short sentences, and the image is made using 22 types of glaze and gold leaf and gold solution, and the seasonal transition colors It was created by expressing 72 in 72 bowls.

Hongo Hideyuki ( HOT WIND BLOWS)
Hongo Hideyuki ( HOT WIND BLOWS)

72 Seasons

A year of nature and tradition seen through the ancient Japanese calendar.

Japan has four beautiful seasons, Spring, Summer, Autumn, Winter. The rich expressions of each season color our lives throughout the year, and historically the Japanese have paid special attention to the seasons and their influence on daily life since olden times.

The origins of that can be found in the ancient 24 season calendar. The path of the sun as seen from Earth creates a zodiac, 360 degrees divided into 24 15-degree sections, each one given a name to depict the seasonal changes through the year, with each season lasting just 15 days.

In olden times a lunar calendar was used, based on the waxing and waning of the moon, which meant that the position of the sun and the dates on the calendar would gradually shift out of sync. It is possible that the 24 season calendar was a way to compensate for this, and provide a calendar that satisfactorily depicted the changes in the seasons which matched with daily life.

And beyond that, each season of the 24 season calendar was then divided again into three more, to create the 72 season calendar. Each of these 72 seasons lasts just five days or so, and the names of each season beautifully depict the tiny, delicate changes in nature that occur around us, year in year out.

 

We have the priviledge to welcome Shiro Tsujimura, the creator of Japan's most beautiful tea bowls

 Shiro Tsujimura
Shiro Tsujimura

"When the monk asked me what will happen after death, I replied that I don't know, and I really don't know. So what will you do when you die? I really don't know. What I know is I only want to do things that I like during the time when I'm alive. So when you die, whether it's the end or whether there's heaven after that, there are religions with answers to that. But actually, it really matters down to what you can do during the time when you are alive. I really like this idea of ignorance is bliss. "

We spoke about beauty, and what this means to him.

"Beauty is a very difficult concept. Dirty things can also be beautiful, for example, when people look at this, they might think it looks dirty, but I think it is beautiful. I think different people have different concepts of beauty, because it depends on each individual. A bowl that can be looked at for hours for its beauty, that's what I hope to make. Something fascinating is this space inside the bowl, something that exists in the bowl."

He says, “The difficult part about Japanese pottery is, if you get better in your skills, your product will become boring.  So you do not try to perfect your skills, but try to create what you want. I think this is difficult, because it is not something that you can work hard for.  You cannot neglect your own feeling and just focus on making a perfect product. Following your feelings, your skills will also improve.”
He says, “The difficult part about Japanese pottery is, if you get better in your skills, your product will become boring. So you do not try to perfect your skills, but try to create what you want. I think this is difficult, because it is not something that you can work hard for. You cannot neglect your own feeling and just focus on making a perfect product. Following your feelings, your skills will also improve.”
『辻』Shiro Tsujimura『おぼこ』
『辻』Shiro Tsujimura『おぼこ』
We spoke about perfection or rather, the imperfection of it.  “Perfection is a little different. Perfection is more of a concept by imperialism and China, which depends on a degree of likeness. But for Japan and Korea, the beauty of imperfection is what we aspire to achieve. This might be unique to the Japanese, but this concept of imperfection has always existed in Korean pottery, and the Japanese thought well of it, which is why we brought in the pottery. I’m not sure how the modern Koreans think now, but during that time, they had this concept of imperfection, and they used the bowls for tea drinking. For pottery making, Japanese people have always seek for the beauty of imperfection, and not perfection.  There are also perfect products, but to me, I don’t really like them.”  And what is important in life?  “The important thing, is to do something that you like. It is not listening to someone, but continuing to believe in what you want to do. Of course, I would like to make something that people would like to use. It is not so much of a message, but I would like people to enjoy using the bowl, with the same feelings that I have.”  He was into painting, but a temple stay changed his path completely.  “I was at the temple for the purpose of meditating. About 3 years. I was meditating, and they had this kind of bowl which they ate with, such as ramen. The monk commented that meditation is similar to the process of bowl-making. I then began to have interest in making the bowl, and it slowly developed into my interest in pottery. The process of bowl-making is similar to meditation, with your thoughts free.  Spiritually, they are similar. Whether mediation or making a bowl or two, it takes the same spirit and mind to do it.”
We spoke about perfection or rather, the imperfection of it. “Perfection is a little different. Perfection is more of a concept by imperialism and China, which depends on a degree of likeness. But for Japan and Korea, the beauty of imperfection is what we aspire to achieve. This might be unique to the Japanese, but this concept of imperfection has always existed in Korean pottery, and the Japanese thought well of it, which is why we brought in the pottery. I’m not sure how the modern Koreans think now, but during that time, they had this concept of imperfection, and they used the bowls for tea drinking. For pottery making, Japanese people have always seek for the beauty of imperfection, and not perfection. There are also perfect products, but to me, I don’t really like them.” And what is important in life? “The important thing, is to do something that you like. It is not listening to someone, but continuing to believe in what you want to do. Of course, I would like to make something that people would like to use. It is not so much of a message, but I would like people to enjoy using the bowl, with the same feelings that I have.” He was into painting, but a temple stay changed his path completely. “I was at the temple for the purpose of meditating. About 3 years. I was meditating, and they had this kind of bowl which they ate with, such as ramen. The monk commented that meditation is similar to the process of bowl-making. I then began to have interest in making the bowl, and it slowly developed into my interest in pottery. The process of bowl-making is similar to meditation, with your thoughts free. Spiritually, they are similar. Whether mediation or making a bowl or two, it takes the same spirit and mind to do it.”

Sazangama

Ryo Inoue born 1947 is located at  89-3 Magarikawa, Hizennachi, Karatsu-shi Access: 20 minutes' drive from JR Karatsu Station

Seeking something unpredictable Having dextrous hands from a young age, making things was a natural conclusion. "Everyone has an opinion, but I work as I like, without constraints.", says Inoue san about seeking freedom in his pursuit of Karatsu ware. The kiln is a four chambered noborigama. For Inoue san, this kiln is a valued family member, and the tool with which he can express his freedom, producing an endless range of unpredictable surfaces and colors. Old Karatsu ware is an ideal. It is impossible to reproduce exactly, but he pursues the ideal every day, in an effort to bring his work closer. Karatsu ware, imperfect, holds a real mystery and charm. Inoue san hopes his work will become part of his customer's lives. With intensity, he faces his work again today. 

Kondou
Kondou
Tanaka Kouta 田中 Firing Adrenaline
Tanaka Kouta 田中 Firing Adrenaline

How Care of your Chawan
A japanese pottery can be made of porous clay. Once used, liquid deposits seep into it, changing color. We love as a charming characteristic rather than a limit. You can have the feeling of a tea bowl adapting to your usage, and with time, each piece becomes your own unique and special.
When you first start using a certain kind of pottery like raku or hagi  you may notice an earthy smell. This comes from the clay and will disappear with use. Due to the porous nature of the clay, a detergent is not recommended. Wash in hot water and let it dry on shade.

Tamaoki Yasuo  Winner of numerous awards and hailed as an Important Intangible Cultural Property of Tajimi City and Gifu Prefecture, both historical centers of Japanese pottery, his works epitomize the beauty of Shino. A high-temperature-fired style of pottery, it often has small nesting holes (suana) that tea ceremony aficionados adore. This characteristic, combined with a yuzuhada (citron skin) finish and a milky glaze made from feldspar, makes Shino one of the most beautiful ceramic methodologies on the planet. Tamaoki's pieces are the culmination of years of stylistic advancement. Creating red and white pieces with iron-colored, ashen clay decorated with thick, beautiful white or reddish glaze, his valuable works are highly praised.  Brief introduction is written for Onihagi web site & is only courtesy of Dr. Ken Jeremiah
Tamaoki Yasuo Winner of numerous awards and hailed as an Important Intangible Cultural Property of Tajimi City and Gifu Prefecture, both historical centers of Japanese pottery, his works epitomize the beauty of Shino. A high-temperature-fired style of pottery, it often has small nesting holes (suana) that tea ceremony aficionados adore. This characteristic, combined with a yuzuhada (citron skin) finish and a milky glaze made from feldspar, makes Shino one of the most beautiful ceramic methodologies on the planet. Tamaoki's pieces are the culmination of years of stylistic advancement. Creating red and white pieces with iron-colored, ashen clay decorated with thick, beautiful white or reddish glaze, his valuable works are highly praised. Brief introduction is written for Onihagi web site & is only courtesy of Dr. Ken Jeremiah
Kumano Kuroemon  Some of the most valuable pieces are made by the enigmatic Kumano Kuroemon. Reclusive, he lives in the mountains near Echizen, Fukui Prefecture, where he has his own private kiln. Yearly, he scours the surrounding mountains for suitable clay, which he shapes into incredible bowls, vases, and more. After applying his own glaze variation, he fires them at an incredible 1520 degrees Celsius, often foregoing sleep for an entire week to constantly regulate the heat.  Most artists would not think of firing a piece at such a high temperature, as it would cause pieces to buckle, distend, or lose their solidity.  Brief introduction is written for Onihagi web site & is only courtesy of Dr. Ken Jeremiah
Kumano Kuroemon Some of the most valuable pieces are made by the enigmatic Kumano Kuroemon. Reclusive, he lives in the mountains near Echizen, Fukui Prefecture, where he has his own private kiln. Yearly, he scours the surrounding mountains for suitable clay, which he shapes into incredible bowls, vases, and more. After applying his own glaze variation, he fires them at an incredible 1520 degrees Celsius, often foregoing sleep for an entire week to constantly regulate the heat. Most artists would not think of firing a piece at such a high temperature, as it would cause pieces to buckle, distend, or lose their solidity. Brief introduction is written for Onihagi web site & is only courtesy of Dr. Ken Jeremiah


"Remnants of a Distant Past"

Brief introduction is written for Onihagi web site &  courtesy of Dr. Ken Jeremiah 

Ken Jeremiah has written numerous books and articles, and he has translated various works from Spanish, Italian, and Japanese. Dr. Ken Jeremiah has written extensively about history, religion, and critical thinking. His previous books include Remnants of a Distant Past, Christian Mummification, Living Buddhas, Aikido Ground Fighting, and If the Samurai Played Golf...Zen Strategies for a Winning Game. He teaches world language and comparative religion courses, and currently resides in Narragansett, RI. 

Kawasaki Daishi Heikenji Temple Omamori

The omamori are Japanese amulets dedicated both to particular Shinto deities and to Buddhist icons. The Japanese word mamori means protection, while the honorific prefix o- gives the word a moving meaning towards the outside, thus going to mean "Your protection".

Traffic safety guard (omamori bag)  Kanji character of "traffic safety" 交通安全御守
Traffic safety guard (omamori bag) Kanji character of "traffic safety" 交通安全御守

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