Goodbye Snow 六月 Rokugatsu JUNE

Don't be fooled by the Japanese calendar, and don't forget your umbrella!

Traditionally called minazuki, "the month of water," June gets more rainfall than other months as the rainy season sets in and sweeps upward through Japan. 

 Minazuki (水無月, "Month of no Water"). "Mizu" (水) means water, "Nai" (無) means none, which normally means "absent" or "there is no", is here ateji, that is, used only for the sound "na". In this name the na is actually a possessive particle, so 'minazuki'means "month of water", not "month without water", and this is in reference to the flooding of the rice fields, which require large quantities of water.  "tsuki" (月) means month. June is basically the rainy season, so why do we refer to it as "Minazuki" 

Sasaki Shoraku「雨雲」
Sasaki Shoraku「雨雲」
Seigan "Peach Tree" Chawan
Seigan "Peach Tree" Chawan
DEISHI SHIBUYA
DEISHI SHIBUYA
YOSHIMOTO Tadashi
YOSHIMOTO Tadashi
Takashi Mashita
Takashi Mashita
Takeshi Nishiura
Takeshi Nishiura
Takashi Mashita (歴史)
Takashi Mashita (歴史)
Seigan Yamane
Seigan Yamane
Mori Seishi
Mori Seishi
Sakakouraizaemon X
Sakakouraizaemon X
Kohei Nakamura
Kohei Nakamura
Deishi Shibuya
Deishi Shibuya
Seimei Tsuji
Seimei Tsuji
三輪休和(萩酒呑)MIWA Kyuwa
三輪休和(萩酒呑)MIWA Kyuwa
★ Genkuro kiln and Kato Takeshi ★
★ Genkuro kiln and Kato Takeshi ★
Masahiko Otani
Masahiko Otani
★中川★Nakagawa Jinenbo ★Korean-style (Chosen) Karatsu ★
★中川★Nakagawa Jinenbo ★Korean-style (Chosen) Karatsu ★
Fujiwara Kikuyo
Fujiwara Kikuyo
Sasaki Shoraku「雨雲」
Sasaki Shoraku「雨雲」
Seigan Oni Hagi Demon (鬼萩茶碗) Demon Chawan
Seigan Oni Hagi Demon (鬼萩茶碗) Demon Chawan
Ken Komatsu
Ken Komatsu
Takahashi Rakusai IV
Takahashi Rakusai IV
Kaneko Nobuhiko Tea Bowl Chawan Loquat glaze
Kaneko Nobuhiko Tea Bowl Chawan Loquat glaze
Seimei Tsuji Delicious Karatsu
Seimei Tsuji Delicious Karatsu
Sakakouraizaemon X
Sakakouraizaemon X
Sakakouraizaemon
Sakakouraizaemon
kaneta Masanao
kaneta Masanao

Kawasaki Daishi Heikenji Temple Omamori

The omamori are Japanese amulets dedicated both to particular Shinto deities and to Buddhist icons. The Japanese word mamori means protection, while the honorific prefix o- gives the word a moving meaning towards the outside, thus going to mean "Your protection".

Traffic safety guard (omamori bag)  Kanji character of "traffic safety" 交通安全御守
Traffic safety guard (omamori bag) Kanji character of "traffic safety" 交通安全御守