JANUARY

 Takashi Minagawa
Takashi Minagawa
Katho Takeshi "Turtle Mine no Momij"
Katho Takeshi "Turtle Mine no Momij"
閔鍾泰作 A monumental Laquer Mother-of-Pearl
閔鍾泰作 A monumental Laquer Mother-of-Pearl
☆ Hori Ichirō ☆
☆ Hori Ichirō ☆
Tsukigata Nahiko
Tsukigata Nahiko
Deishi Shibuya
Deishi Shibuya
Ando Hidetake
Ando Hidetake
Kaneta Masanao
Kaneta Masanao
  Tsukigata Nahiko
Tsukigata Nahiko
Tsukigata Nahiko
Tsukigata Nahiko
Tamaoki Yasuo
Tamaoki Yasuo
Kumano Kurouemon
Kumano Kurouemon

Tamaoki Yasuo

Winner of numerous awards and hailed as an Important Intangible Cultural Property of Tajimi City and Gifu Prefecture, both historical centers of Japanese pottery, his works epitomize the beauty of Shino. A high-temperature-fired style of pottery, it often has small nesting holes (suana) that tea ceremony aficionados adore. This characteristic, combined with a yuzuhada (citron skin) finish and a milky glaze made from feldspar, makes Shino one of the most beautiful ceramic methodologies on the planet. Tamaoki's pieces are the culmination of years of stylistic advancement. Creating red and white pieces with iron-colored, ashen clay decorated with thick, beautiful white or reddish glaze, his valuable works are highly praised.

Brief introduction  by Dr. Ken Jeremiah 

Kumano Kuroemon

Some of the most valuable pieces are made by the enigmatic Kumano Kuroemon. Reclusive, he lives in the mountains near Echizen, Fukui Prefecture, where he has his own private kiln. Yearly, he scours the surrounding mountains for suitable clay, which he shapes into incredible bowls, vases, and more. After applying his own glaze variation, he fires them at an incredible 1520 degrees Celsius, often foregoing sleep for an entire week to constantly regulate the heat.

Most artists would not think of firing a piece at such a high temperature, as it would cause pieces to buckle, distend, or lose their solidity.

Brief introduction  by Dr. Ken Jeremiah 

Ken Jeremiah has written numerous books and articles, and he has translated various works from Spanish, Italian, and Japanese. Dr. Ken Jeremiah has written extensively about history, religion, and critical thinking. His previous books include Remnants of a Distant Past, Christian Mummification, Living Buddhas, Aikido Ground Fighting, and If the Samurai Played Golf...Zen Strategies for a Winning Game. He teaches world language and comparative religion courses, and currently resides in Narragansett, RI. 

Guide to Hanko
Guide to Hanko

SECTION IS LOCKED - ONLY BY INQUIRY

MIWA KAZUHIKO "EL CAPITAN" KJUSETSU XIII
MIWA KAZUHIKO "EL CAPITAN" KJUSETSU XIII

Kawasaki Daishi Heikenji Temple Omamori

The omamori are Japanese amulets dedicated both to particular Shinto deities and to Buddhist icons. The Japanese word mamori means protection, while the honorific prefix o- gives the word a moving meaning towards the outside, thus going to mean "Your protection".

Traffic safety guard (omamori bag)  Kanji character of "traffic safety" 交通安全御守
Traffic safety guard (omamori bag) Kanji character of "traffic safety" 交通安全御守

Only with the passage of time, after years and experience, it is possible to understand and evaluate a ceramic, I believe that the production processes and temperatures are so extreme to the point that normal defects can occur, to which the Japanese often give a name. For those who don't understand the japanese spirit and who are not ready to fully embrace this philosophy, please don't buy items from my gallery. Ceramics have different stories and although they can be closed in a showcase, the acceptance that may have been destined for their normal use is the basis of what are the foundations of a chawan, cup, a plate or a vase. We can consider everything as a work of Art without ever forgetting their true nature. Knowing how to identify when a defect is a real oven or a previous user is not easy, that's why I am here. I don't want to make any reference to collectors, because i also like having an object that has never been used, but i do not want to relate to serial accumulators that have absurd claims.