Risshun (立春) Coming of Spring

Hongo Hideyuki Gold Chawan 「東風解凍」February 4-8 The east wind melts the ice. tea bowl winter Solstice

Hongo Hideyuki Gold Chawan 「東風解凍」February 4-8 The east wind melts the ice. tea bowl winter Solstice

二月四日〜八日
一候 『東風解凍』thaw season
はるかぜこおりをとく
    東風が厚い氷を解かし始める    
1.
2/4-8: East wind melts ice.
72 Seasons A year of nature and tradition seen through the ancient Japanese calendar. Japan has four beautiful seasons, Spring, Summer, Autumn, Winter. The rich expressions of each season color our lives throughout the year, and historically the Japanese have paid special attention to the seasons and their influence on daily life since olden times.  The origins of that can be found in the ancient 24 season calendar. The path of the sun as seen from Earth creates a zodiac, 360 degrees divided into 24 15-degree sections, each one given a name to depict the seasonal changes through the year, with each season lasting just 15 days.  In olden times a lunar calendar was used, based on the waxing and waning of the moon, which meant that the position of the sun and the dates on the calendar would gradually shift out of sync. It is possible that the 24 season calendar was a way to compensate for this, and provide a calendar that satisfactorily depicted the changes in the seasons which matched with daily life.  And beyond that, each season of the 24 season calendar was then divided again into three more, to create the 72 season calendar. Each of these 72 seasons lasts just five days or so, and the names of each season beautifully depict the tiny, delicate changes in nature that occur around us, year in year out.
72 Seasons A year of nature and tradition seen through the ancient Japanese calendar. Japan has four beautiful seasons, Spring, Summer, Autumn, Winter. The rich expressions of each season color our lives throughout the year, and historically the Japanese have paid special attention to the seasons and their influence on daily life since olden times. The origins of that can be found in the ancient 24 season calendar. The path of the sun as seen from Earth creates a zodiac, 360 degrees divided into 24 15-degree sections, each one given a name to depict the seasonal changes through the year, with each season lasting just 15 days. In olden times a lunar calendar was used, based on the waxing and waning of the moon, which meant that the position of the sun and the dates on the calendar would gradually shift out of sync. It is possible that the 24 season calendar was a way to compensate for this, and provide a calendar that satisfactorily depicted the changes in the seasons which matched with daily life. And beyond that, each season of the 24 season calendar was then divided again into three more, to create the 72 season calendar. Each of these 72 seasons lasts just five days or so, and the names of each season beautifully depict the tiny, delicate changes in nature that occur around us, year in year out.

72 Seasons

A year of nature and tradition seen through the ancient Japanese calendar.

Japan has four beautiful seasons, Spring, Summer, Autumn, Winter. The rich expressions of each season color our lives throughout the year, and historically the Japanese have paid special attention to the seasons and their influence on daily life since olden times.

The origins of that can be found in the ancient 24 season calendar. The path of the sun as seen from Earth creates a zodiac, 360 degrees divided into 24 15-degree sections, each one given a name to depict the seasonal changes through the year, with each season lasting just 15 days.

In olden times a lunar calendar was used, based on the waxing and waning of the moon, which meant that the position of the sun and the dates on the calendar would gradually shift out of sync. It is possible that the 24 season calendar was a way to compensate for this, and provide a calendar that satisfactorily depicted the changes in the seasons which matched with daily life.

And beyond that, each season of the 24 season calendar was then divided again into three more, to create the 72 season calendar. Each of these 72 seasons lasts just five days or so, and the names of each season beautifully depict the tiny, delicate changes in nature that occur around us, year in year out.

From the 72-color gold bowl and the space, this is the first season of Tatsuharu "Dongfeng Thaw".
It was created based on the theme of "a device that engraves the seventy-two seasons that change every five days", and based on the twenty-four paragraphs that were born in ancient China, one year was divided into 72 equal parts every five days. Seventy-two signs with the meaning of the calendar.
Twenty-two weather patterns in Japan, which match the climate of Japan, represent changes in flora and fauna and weather in seventy-two short sentences. It was created by expressing 72 with 72 bowls.
This work expresses "Dongfeng thaw", which is one of the beginnings of the beginning of the spring, when the easterly wind begins to thaw the thick ice, and whether it is designed from the perspective to the upper part of the body is like ice. It is like this, and it is a work with an original view of the world by finishing it into a container shape that exudes exquisite distortion with plenty of gold on the bottom.

七十二候: Japan's 72 Seasons

A Basic Introduction to the Shichijuni-kou (七十二候), or "Seventy-Two Seasons" For hundreds of years, Japanese farmers, tea masters, artists, even chefs have followed a special almanac that marks the changing seasons, based on the annual occurrence of certain natural events and phenomena. This almanac, carried over from China, separates the solar year evenly into 24 seasons called the Nijushisekki (二十四節気), each of which are divided a further three times, creating the Shichijuni-kou (七十二候), or "seventy-two climates (seasons)."Over the centuries, the almanac has changed from its original to more accurately reflect the wildlife and natural patterns of life on the Japanese archipelago, though discrepancies frequently occur. Nonetheless, the magic of the Shichijuni-kou lies in its ability to train the observer to become keenly aware of the rhythms of the natural world.

Much of Japanese culture can be understood in greater detail by following the Shichijuni-kou. No doubt haiku and tanka poetry experts can elaborate much better than I ever could onthe Shichijuni-kou's literary significance throughout Japan's history. Personally, it has helped me to better learn and enjoy the different species of flora and fauna I've encountered while here in Japan. Struggling as a foreigner without roots in this country, thanks to the Shichijuniji-kou, I can better appreciate my surroundings in a more intimate context. I've also come to understand the reasons for the timing of certain events such as festivals, planting rituals, even advertising campaigns on TV! People are shaped by their environment, and the Shichijuni-kou reveals the myriad ways the land shaped the Japanese Anyone can make their own seasonal almanac, unique to their own corner of the world. How cool would it be if everyone tried? Feel free to share your own observations of where you live in the comments section! Come walk with me as we savor the best of Japan's 72 seasons! :-)

Credits & Acknowledgements:

The Seasons feature of this blog was greatly inspired by the following sources (any similarity in content is purely coincidental, as the seasons and all associated natural phenomenon are not subject to copyright laws) people.

Honda Yosaburo Meiji important Japanese cloisonné enamel burning censer

 Where the lords of the Mori clan were enshrined, ruins of the castle tower (yagura) stay at the foot of Mount Shizuki with only one turret (yagura) higher up the mountain, as a look out over the sea, a new Hagi generation is born, saturated with melancholy, unfulfilled longing ruins and desolation on a palm of a hand. This is the inevitable ruination of the present.

important Japanese cloisonné enamel burning censer Honda Yosaburo, made towards the end of the Meiji Period (1868-1912). The Koro is comprised of Eight panels, decorated with the phoenix and Oni motif. The pattern is a meticulous one and in a sense the crowning achievement of the Kyoto School, whose preference for dense symmetry proved less commercial than the naturalism of Nagoya.The good size and his unusual enamels attest to the individual quality of this Japanese peace of Art. The condition is exceptional.