en-SHOWA

16/03/2021

Kuba Dozo copper silver inlay hammer crafted censer Shōwa Ito Hisadodo di hiroshima

 The Shōwa period, or Shōwa period, is the period of Japanese history corresponding to the reign of Emperor Hirohito; it is between 25 December 1926 and 7 January 1989. It was the longest reign of all those of the Japanese emperors. Hand hammered silver copper censer Dimension: Height 12.2cm Diameter 12.3cm Gross weight: 330g Condition: There are no scratches and good products. . Kuba Dozo copper silver inlaywith hammer crafted censer incense tool 12.2㎝ 直径 12.3㎝ 330 g

Takenaka clan

The Takenaka kamon.

伊藤 久 芳 堂 造 り

Hisikari crest Takenaka clan

The Takenaka clan (竹 中 氏 Takenaka-shi) is a Japanese family descended from the Seiwa Genji line's Toki branch. [1]

The family, with holdings in the Fuwa district of Mino Province, was founded by Iwate Shigeuji, who was the first to take the name Takenaka. [1]

Perhaps most famed during the headship of the strategist Takenaka Shigeharu (Hanbei), the family became hatamoto under Tokugawa Ieyasu in the Edo era. [2] Takenaka Shigekata, the family head in the Bakumatsu era, was a famous field commander during the Boshin War.

A branch of the Takenaka family was until 1634 daimyo of the Takada and then Funai Domains (Bungo province), before having its lands returned to the Shogunate.

The Takenaka clan (Takenaka-shi) is a Japanese family descended from the Toki branch of Seiwa Genji.

The family, with businesses in the Fuwa District of Mino Province, was founded by Iwate Shigeuji, who was the first to take the name Takenaka.

Takenaka Shigekata, head of the family in the Bakumatsu era, was a famous field commander during the Boshin (Hanbei) war, famous during the chief strategist Takenaka Shigeharu (Hanbei), the family became hatamoto under Tokugawa Ieyasu in the Edo era . .

A branch of the Takenaka family was until 1634 daimyo of Takada and then Funai Domains (province of Bungo), before returning its lands to the Shogunate.

The Takenaka of Mino province claimed descent from Minamoto Yorimitsu and were an off-shoot of the Tôki clan. Several generations were known as the Iwate, with Takenaka Shigeuji adopting the name Takenaka around the beginning of the 16th Century. Shigeuji's son Shigemoto came to serve Saitô Dôsan. Takenaka Shigeharu (better known as Takenaka Hanbei) enjoyed the favor of Toyotomi Hideyoshi and as a result the Takenaka came to hold the status of daimyô at the start of the Edo Period. This was to be lost in 1634 through the shameful behavior of Takenaka Shigekatsu.

The kamon Takenaka.

Takenaka province of Mino province claimed the descent of Minamoto Yorimitsu and were a home run by the Tôki clan. Several generations were known as Iwate, with Takenaka Shigeuji adopting the name Takenaka around the beginning of the 16th century. Shigemoto, son of Shigeuji, came to serve Saitô Dôsan. Takenaka Shigeharu (better known as Takenaka Hanbei) appreciated the favor of Toyotomi Hideyoshi and consequently the Takenaka came to maintain the status of daimyô at the beginning of the Edo Period. This was to be lost in 1634 through Takenaka Shigekatsu's shameful behavior. beautiful Japanese copper 'do-chu' censer is marked 'Hisayoshi' on the side. The brilliant rich color of this type of ware is achieved by adding smoked straw during firing and often deepens over time. This stained metal canvas makes the perfect backdrop for the decorative feudal samurai clan effigy

Produced in Hiroshima by Ito Hisayoshi, this type of do-chu (metal craft-literally translated as 銅 "do" copper alloy 蟲 "chu" insect) has over 400 years of history with its roots in 17th century Edo. At the time, Lord Asano gathered the most skilled metalworkers from across the land to produce high-quality hammered metal-wares which later became popular among feudal lords. According to legend, the term "copper insect" came about when the Lord Asano upon observing the head shoku-nin (craftsman) in charge of creating these metal wares-known for his intense concentration and attention to detail-proclaimed that he looked like a "copper insect hard at work."

This piece is in mint antique condition, on the side of the censer are engraved the characters 久 芳 堂 (Hisayoshi).

It is a work of Ito Hisayoshi

masterpiece of modern copper

He created a unique piece with his copper mortar.

KAMON COAT OF ARMS OF CLAN Takenaka. (Maru ni kumai Sasa) or (Gokani Sasa)

Kamon (家 紋), are the Japanese emblems used to decorate and identify an individual or a family ...

initially used by samurai clans to distinguish and recognize themselves more easily on the battlefield. These are generally stylized drawings inserted inside a geometric shape. Their use dates back to the Kamakura period. During the Edo Period, only the daimyo had the right to own two. Since the beginning of the Meiji period, their use has also spread among the people.

The Japanese kamons indicated the lineage, kinship or social position of those who exhibited them. They are believed to have been born in the Nara (710-784) or Heian (794-1185) period when it was customary to apply family emblems externally on the chariots carrying the nobles.

Takenaka Shigeharu Clan Initially served the Saitō clan of Mino province, but later formed a revolt and took over the Saitō clan castle at Mount Inaba. He then directed the defense against Oda Nobunaga's forces during the siege of Inabayama Castle. Toyotomi Hideyoshi was so impressed with him that he invited Shigeharu to join his forces as a strategist. Shigeharu has made many contributions to Hideyoshi with his exceptional talent in that field.

He died of disease during Hideyoshi's attack on the Mōri in the Chūgoku region of Japan, while Miki Castle was besieged.

The custom of the Mori clan of giving a Chawan is known to many,

Unique object of rare beauty and history

The Takenaka of Mino province claimed descent from Minamoto Yorimitsu and were an off-shoot of the Tôki clan. Several generations were known as the Iwate, with Takenaka Shigeuji adopting the name Takenaka around the beginning of the 16th Century. Shigeuji's son Shigemoto came to serve Saitô Dôsan. Takenaka Shigeharu (better known as Takenaka Hanbei) enjoyed the favor of Toyotomi Hideyoshi and as a result the Takenaka came to hold the status of daimyô at the start of the Edo Period. This was to be lost in 1634 through the shameful behavior of Takenaka Shigekatsu.

This creation is shiny and velvety like golden skin

The model that was hit by the hammer has such a beautiful light that it emits a beautiful glow from all sides.

The feel is very luxurious but unfortunately it has a decided weight of around 350-400 grams

It is a scratch-free and timeless jewel that gives off its own unique atmosphere and that makes it important.

Ash from Mount Fuji will be provided (on request only) at a cost of 25 euros.

ERA SHOWA (1926-1989)

Hiroshito, with the name of Showa, was an emperor in love with the European example.

It was then that Japan mainly referred to Germany and accepted Hitler's ideas (a thought that was not a little in contrast with reality, since Hitler exalted the Aryan race), losing the support of the Americans.

The Japanese, then deeply nationalists, were convinced that they could economically and politically dominate the Asian continent.

Thus it was that, after exiting the League of Nations, Japan began to expand by occupying Manchuria and subsequently invading part of China.

The United States and Great Britain then imposed economic sanctions on him. In 1941 Japan bombed Pearl Harboure and continued to expand its borders, thanks also to its impressive naval fleets, superior even to the American ones.

The expansion of Japan in the Pacific was now aimed at the Australian coasts, reachable by exploiting the support of an island called Midway, which would have provided the necessary airstrip.

But the American fleets, thanks to a stroke of luck, tracked down the Japanese ones at sea, which were defeated. Japan's advance into the Pacific began to recede slowly, but the event that led to the actual end of the war was the US atomic bombing of Hiroshima (August 6) and Nagasaki (August 9) in 1945.

A few days later the emperor himself announced to the nation that the war had been lost.

The United States occupied Japan for about 7 years, but remained on some islands (including Okinawa, still home to American bases today) which were returned in the following years.

After the war, Japan reintegrated into the international community, establishing itself more and more as a great economic power.

The Kamon are family crests born in the eleventh century to distinguish the most important Japanese families or, later, the most important samurai clans.

In ancient times, in fact, only these families had coats of arms, which they used to distinguish themselves, also because their surnames could often be similar.

Only they, in fact, were allowed to have a name and a surname, while the "common" population had only the name. Later, after the Meiji period, everyone was entitled to a surname, thus allowing the Kamon to spread easily throughout Japan.

These coats of arms were and, still today, are used to decorate one's kimono, for a personal Furoshiki (square cloth) or used to bring a gift to someone, to decorate ceremonial objects, lanterns, and for many other uses.

Today the most important Japanese families make a very frequent use of Kamon, while in common families it is less used or, not having a centennial history, changed to one's liking.

Kamon is handed down thanks to the first son born in the family. Any other children can decide whether to carry on the same family crest or change and create a new one. Kamon of the Tokugawa Family

In the case of a married couple, since the Kamon is personal, both spouses will carry the coat of arms of their family, but when the woman dies, the Kamon belonging to her husband's family will also be depicted on her tombstone.

In the case of a woman belonging to a family whose Kamon is disappearing due to the lack of male children, the husband (if not the firstborn) can choose to abandon his Kamon to adopt and therefore carry on that of his wife's family.

Thanks to this system, the oldest Kamons have survived for thousands of years, such as that of the Tokugawa family.

Imperial Family Cigarettes The Imperial Family owns a Kamon featuring a chrysanthemum. Until a few years ago, it had its own production of cigarettes, each of which was branded with the family Kamon.

If someone went to the Imperial Palace to provide services or to do some work, he had a good chance that he would be given a pack of these cigarettes.

Today, also for reasons related to the fight against smoking, instead of cigarettes, the Imperial Family distributes sweets as a gift, naturally in a package duly decorated with the Kamon of the chrysanthemum.

In today's young people, Kamon is often used as a fashion element to decorate one's bag or clothing and there are agencies specialized in creating modern and colorful Kamon.

It is not easy to define the ancient history of Japan, isolated for millennia from the continent, as the first writings date back only to 712 AD. Everything that happened before is largely deduced from archaeological finds or mythology.

The territory now called Japan was initially connected to Korea and Siberia by two mainland bridges, while the Yellow Sea and the East China Sea were almost dry.

From this geographical situation and from the numerous archaeological finds, it is clear that the first populations to settle in the territory (about 500,000 years ago), before the connections with the continent and the surrounding areas were submerged thanks to the rising oceanic waters at the end of the he last ice age (which occurred about 13,000 years ago), were both of Siberian / Manchurian origin and of Korean / South Chinese origin.

These populations, finding a cold territory but rich in woods, developed aptitudes for hunting, coming to make the first equipment with sharp stones already 30,000 years ago.

The history of Japan is divided into different periods: JOMON PERIOD, YAYOI PERIOD, YAMATO PERIOD, NARA PERIOD, HEIAN PERIOD, KAMAKURA PERIOD, MUROMACHI PERIOD, AZUCHI MOMOYAMA PERIOD, EDO PERIOD, MEIJI PERIOD, ERA TAISHO, ERAISE SHAISE .

JOMON PERIOD (12.700 - 400 BC approx.)

It is a historical period that spans more than 10,000 years.

The ancient Japanese populations, at the same time as the continental ones, developed the technique for making pottery: thanks to the possibility of having containers for keeping and cooking food, Japan experienced a period of population boom.

The name "Jomon", from which both the name of the historical period and that of the populations who inhabited the archipelago at that time derive, derives from the clay cord (Jomon, in fact) that was twisted around the vase, as a decoration, before cooking.

The Jomon populations were oriented towards hunting and gathering vegetables, rather than their cultivation: the territory was so rich and fertile that there was no need to cultivate it. There were not even great social differences and contacts with the continent were very few, so much so that during this very long period life in Japan remained almost unchanged while, on the contrary, in continental Asia, great changes and evolutions took place.

The arrival and stabilization on the territory of the first "Ainu" tribes, which are also spoken of in Japanese mythology, is also attributed to the Jomon period. Nowadays there are descendants of the Ainu in some ethnic groups of northern Japan, conservatives of the Ainu language, totally different from Japanese. Around 660 BC the beginning of the reign of Jinmu Tenno is dated, the first mythological Emperor of Japan, son of descendants of the Sun Goddess Amaterasu, who was later succeeded by another 13 descendant emperors, also mythological and not historically documented. YAYOI PERIOD (400 AC - 300 DC approximately)

Starting from 400 BC, the archipelago came into close contact especially with the populations from Korea, which in turn was in contact with the Chinese populations.

Contact with the Korean populations meant that numerous innovations were introduced in Japan including, at the forefront, metallurgy and intensive agriculture.

The name "Yayoi" derives from a district of Tokyo in which, in recent times, the find of a particular type of vase has been found which attests to these historical changes.

In addition to metallurgy and agriculture, during this era, bronze processing, the burial of the dead in large urns, the processing of necklaces with glass beads, the storage of rice, etc. were also introduced.

New species of plants and tubers and new animal species arrived in the archipelago and the "yayoi" change quickly affected most of Japan: in the central-southern part the change was almost total, while in the north, thanks to completely different climatic conditions , the influence was minor, but still left very little room for what was the primitive "Jomon" culture.

In this period, the first social stratifications began to appear, as well as the imposing tumulus tombs in which the remains of nobles and emperors were preserved, along with rich treasures. YAMATO PERIOD (300 - 710 AD approximately)

It starts from the empire of Jimmu Tenno who, according to mythology, had founded the Yamato kingdom centuries ago on the island of Honshu.

The Yamato were great warriors and their families were very numerous (among them, the Fujiwara family). They were great observers of Shinto, thus cultivating the need to be pure in both soul and body. Thanks to them, the first Japanese baths were born, in which they purified themselves after having "dirty" their body with impure actions or after bloody battles.

After death, the house of the dead was set on fire and if an emperor died, the capital of the kingdom was moved to another city.

The deaths of the emperors (and also of the nobles) were also consecrated with impressive tumulus tombs (called Kofun) where, in addition to treasures and riches, courtiers were also buried after being killed for devotion (over the centuries replaced by clay statues ).

In this period the Japanese referred to China both for science and technology, and for writing. It was from the Chinese, in fact, that ancient Japan, initially called Yamato, changed its name into Nihon (Nippon), to the letter "origin of the sun", or "land of the rising sun".

The finds of the first Japanese historical / mythological writings belong to the end of this historical period, that is to the year 712.

In the southernmost areas of the Yamato kingdom, the people were ruled by queens but soon the roles were reversed and over time they lost all the power they had previously, thanks also to the influences of the religions of Buddhism and Confucianism that came. introduced in that period.

This period, in particular, was of great contact with Korea: there are historical disputes over the acquisition of Korean culture and technology by the Japanese or, vice versa, the idea of ​​the Koreans

starting the first imperial dynasty.

Also in the Yamato period, one of the most precious finds of the time belongs: the Eta Funayama sword, made of iron and silver and decorated with inscriptions in Chinese that tell of a great King. Also in this case the dispute focuses on the Japan question- Korea, or which of the two populations actually laid the foundations of modern culture. NARA PERIOD (710-794)

Short but intense, in this period the tradition of moving the capital of the kingdom on the death of the Emperor was abolished, fixing it in Nara.

Buddhism was introduced as an official religion and this choice was officially consecrated with the construction of the Daibutsu (statue of the great Buddha, about 15 meters high) in Nara.

Also during the Nara period, two great works were written that still today constitute strong historical and mythological references: the Kojiki (digestion of ancient things) and the Nihongi-shoki (Japanese chronicles). HEIAN PERIOD (795-1185)

In this period the capital was moved from Nara to present-day Kyoto, where the imperial court remained for about a millennium.

Japan began to have its own artistic and religious identity, thanks also to the fusion of the ideas of Buddhism and the Shinto religion, for which the gods began to be considered as manifestations of the Buddha.

The emperors, retreating to a marginal role to follow their own spirituality, gave way to the Fujiwara family, who gradually took over power.

The borders of the kingdom continued to extend and the wealth of the court was contrasted by the poverty of the peasants (often ruled by military families), called to give part of the harvest in exchange for protection.

Thus was born the samurai class and, after internal struggles between the Fujiwara and other noble families, the Minamoto clan came to power, in which Yorimoto Minamoto was the first shogun to rule the kingdom, supported by the samurai class. The capital was moved to Kamakura. KAMAKURA PERIOD (1192-1333)

Japan was ruled by the faithful of the Shogun, the Daimyo, supported in turn by the Bushi (samurai soldiers), who followed a code of loyalty and honor called Bushido.

The culture of weapons and in particular of swords, of which Masamune was the best craftsman, also made room. But as time passed Minamoto lost his power and was replaced by a member of the Fujiwara family, and by the Emperor Go-Daigo.

In the meantime invasions from China were repelled and later by the barbarians who, although numerous, were decimated by a storm at sea. This divine wind, called "kamikaze" later became the cry of Japanese suicide aviators during World War II.

The current government, however, was losing the esteem of the samurai, so internal wars took place between the government and the Shogun. MUROMACHI PERIOD (1335-1572)

After the defeat of Emperor Go-Daigo the royal house was divided between the cities of Kyoto and Yoshino for more than half a century. Several emperors succeeded one another but, unable to govern, they plunged Japan into chaos.

At the same time, Kinkaku-ji and Ginkaku-ji were built in Kyoto and the arts developed. This was also the period in which Westerners discovered Japan, introducing firearms (which the Japanese soon learned to build) and the religion of Christianity.

But Japan, given the unrest created by the introduction of new cultures from the West, decided to maintain permanent relations only with Holland. AZUCHI MOMOYAMA PERIOD (1573-1600)

It was a very short period, in which Nobunaga Oda marched on Kyoto to re-establish the rule of the Shoguns.

He was the first to use firearms, and was murdered by one of his guards. In this period the castles of the various local governors were built and fortified on the heights.

The most impressive castle is the Osaka-Jo, for which boulders were used whose dimensions even reached 10 meters in length and 8 meters in height.

The roads, on the other hand, were built as labyrinths, so that the enemies were disoriented and their advance was easily controlled.

In the same period the Daimyo Toyotomi Hideyoshi undertook invasive actions in Korea, for which for 35 years the Korean territory was totally subject to Japan, which tried to annihilate the local culture, bringing home the macabre trophy consisting of 20 thousand severed noses. EDO (1600-1867)

This period began with the Tokugawa government, which became absolute ruler of Japan and moved to Edo, now called Tokyo.

This was the time when Westerners began to put pressure on Japan again, both on the commercial and religious sides, creating many threats to the country.

The first railway network connecting Tokyo to Yokohama was built: the Japanese authorities of the time took off their shoes in Tokyo to get on the train and were amazed not to find them in Yokohama at the end of their journey.

In 1889 the first Japanese constitution was promulgated and later wars were fought against China (after which a part of Korea was annexed to Japan) and Russia, both successfully won, thanks to which Japan established itself as a world power. ERA TAISHO (1912-1925)

Emperor Taisho, son of Meiji, set aside for the government of the country due to health problems (not well identified) leaving much room for his ministers.

In this period Japan, thanks to its reputation as a world power, built fleets of warships.

At the same time, the United States severely restricted Japanese immigration and Japan was negatively impressed, giving rise to tensions between the two countries, which temporarily died out with their alliance during World War I, after which Japan entered to be part of the League of Nations.

Towards the end of the Taisho era, Japan was hit by a very violent earthquake that caused fires and more than 100,000 victims in the Kanto area, for which many Koreans were murdered by Japanese fanatics on charges of having contaminated the land and caused that. disaster.ERA SHOWA (1926-1989)

Hiroshito, with the name of Showa, was an emperor in love with the European example.

It was then that Japan made reference mainly to Germany and accepted Hitler's ideas (a thought not a little in contrast with reality, since Hitler exalted the Aryan race), losing the support of the Americans.

The Japanese, then deeply nationalists, were convinced that they could economically and politically dominate the Asian continent.

Thus it was that, after exiting the League of Nations, Japan began to expand by occupying Manchuria and subsequently invading part of China.

The United States and Great Britain then imposed economic sanctions on him. In 1941 Japan bombed Pearl Harbor and continued to expand its borders, thanks also to its impressive naval fleets, even superior to those of America.

The expansion of Japan in the Pacific was now aimed at the Australian coasts, reachable by exploiting the support of an island called Midway, which would have provided the necessary landing strip.

But the American fleets, thanks to a stroke of luck, tracked down the Japanese ones at sea, which were defeated. Japan's advance into the Pacific began to retreat slowly, but the event that led to the actual end of the war was the US atomic bombing of Hiroshima (August 6) and Nagasaki (August 9) in 1945.

A few days later the emperor himself announced to the nation that the war had been lost.

The United States occupied Japan for about 7 years, but remained on some islands (including Okinawa, still home to American bases today) which were returned in the following years.

After the war, Japan reintegrated into the international community, establishing itself more and more as a great economic power.ERA HEISEI (1989-present)

When his father died, Emperor Akihito, considered the 125th successor of Emperor Jimmu, ascended the throne with the name of Heisei (the current Emperor).

The Emperor met his wife Michiko on a tennis court. Since then, tennis has grown in importance, also as an auspicious element for sentimental encounters.

The two imperial spouses also broke traditions by deciding to raise their children without the help of a governess.

Currently the Japanese government system is based on the separation of legislative, executive and judicial powers. Legislative power is exercised by the National Diet, composed of the House of Representatives and the House of Councilors. Executive power is exercised by the Government, made up of a Prime Minister and no more than twenty Ministers.

The judicial power (totally independent from the legislative and executive ones) is exercised by the Supreme Court, eight High Courts and numerous District Courts, in addition to the magistrates.

The Emperor is the Head of State, but has no legislative, executive or judicial powers.