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13.6(34.5cm) x Depth 10.4(26.5cm) x Thickness 0.4(1.0cm)PPottery plate , tray or for decoration by Seigan Yamane. Represent  'Fugoku 36-kei, originally painted by Hokusai Katsushika' is completely hand-painted on the plate.
13.6(34.5cm) x Depth 10.4(26.5cm) x Thickness 0.4(1.0cm)PPottery plate , tray or for decoration by Seigan Yamane. Represent 'Fugoku 36-kei, originally painted by Hokusai Katsushika' is completely hand-painted on the plate.
High quality 4K Res when u adjust the screen orientation.
High quality 4K Res when u adjust the screen orientation.
[ Firing adrenaline ]
[ Firing adrenaline ]

Vibrant continuous movement of the Circle: A mind that Buddhism teaches, a heart that is free from obsession. 

Ten-ni-mon-nashi 

How many times have you experienced a situation where you were forced and there was no way out? Many have experienced this in their life. On that occasion, no one knows what the right choices are, but at that moment there are also those who reflected, saying to themselves: "I would rather die". Even so, albeit exaggerating, it can still be said to have had a good experience.

This Zen word 「円相天無門地無戸」expresses this situation. It means a situation in which there is no escape in heaven or on earth, and the sensations that can be experienced. This is one of many ways of doing things, but when you are in front of your choice: at the  〇斗  top of the pillar and nothing just can't help you, maybe u can just try to sit still without rattling. Rather, it might be better to say that there is no other way. If you have nowhere to escape, the advice is to wait for the hour without running away.

Surprisingly, there is a place where the air flows calmly even in the eye of a typhoon.

Tsukigata Nahiko  "ten-ni-mon-nashi" 天無門 地無戸 てんにもんなく、ちにこなし
Tsukigata Nahiko "ten-ni-mon-nashi" 天無門 地無戸 てんにもんなく、ちにこなし
☆  Red & White Plum ☆  Suigetsugama
☆ Red & White Plum ☆ Suigetsugama

It is meaningless just to inherit the traditions of Japanese pottery, unless you add your own ideas...but if you overdo yourself, you might ruin the traditions. The point is to make the best use of the old methods and ideas. -Toyozo Arakawa, Japan, "Living National Treasure"

Naokata Ueda Shigaraki
Naokata Ueda Shigaraki
Chawan CUP SUBLIME Mitsuharu Yanagisawa "Persimmon calyx" Spring Opening BOWL
Chawan CUP SUBLIME Mitsuharu Yanagisawa "Persimmon calyx" Spring Opening BOWL
☆  [Yaemon Kato]  ☆
☆ [Yaemon Kato] ☆
Takahashi Rakusai IV
Takahashi Rakusai IV
☆ TSUJIMURA ☆
☆ TSUJIMURA ☆
ONI (鬼) ::
ONI (鬼) ::

THE BREATH OF THE FOREST BY HIDEKI YANASHITA 

Katamigawa chawan (mikomi to kōdai) 

How to hand down raku-yaki embodying wabisabi spirit (the aesthetic sense in Japanese art emphasizing quiet simplicity)

Onihagi had the chance to ask some questions to Hideki Yanashita: a promising young artist from Iga, Mie Prefecture, with works  based on Shira, raku, while taking on a variety of styles including white glazing common to Nezumi Shino and Oribe. Being a conversation that goes on and on, and being basically an important artist of the new wave who has brought a lot of innovation, also to respect his privacy, i put the first part here very dehydrated avoiding to let u read the direct questions.

I have faithfully respected Hideki san's answers as the teacher seems to be very familiar with English. He has an innate curiosity and an incredibly kind soul, one of the main reasons that prompted all of Onihagi's tm to seriously consider a important selection with the aim of consolidating future projects.

He kindly asked me to just call him Hideki, which highlights the profound humility of man and artist, a sensitivity that is all in his works. My dream is that you too can feel the same emotions i feel using one of these works, perhaps when it rains or when the weather gets cloudy and gloomy.

Manuel Jensa

"Hideki 季器. In kanji character 季 means season, 器 means ware, vessel, container, something like that. I was born in Tokyo. All my works are based on "Wabi Sabi", so I always stay to traditional or on the extension line. This is very important as i really respect tradition very much as i also respect nature. I started to make pottery at the age of 24 and when i was 30 years old i was inspired by "Wabi Sabi" in Momoyama period. Actually my master is Mr, Sugimoto Sadamitsu but I wasn't taught by him step by step. Clay is very important thing for me and actually i dig in the search of the perfect clays (not all the clays), because clay makes my final result good or not. I pay a lot of attention when i work with clay, i use only my hands and legs (when I use my kick wheel) . Actually my clays are so special, crucial in what i do. I use clay which is very far from my house and i ask to a local potter who I know to dig selected raw soil, and i avoid to buy from popular clay shop. I have two kilns for wood firing and one powered by oil. I am a kind of man who liked to travel in the past and I still like but now i considering not too often to get on the plane, because of environment."

Hideki Yanashita

"I am looking back to the works of momoyama and i wondering here the people from wabi sabi where lookin. If i go same directions as the people of wabi sabi at least, i shall come to see the figure of truth someday"

Introduction by Ken Jeremiah written exclusively for Onihagi.com

The World on a tea bowl "A miniature universe"

These days, the idea of "mindfulness" is praised, but it is nothing new. It is nothing more than remaining in the present, the mantra of both Zen and Daoist ideals, and the concept reflected in the art and crafts of the traditional tea ceremony. The traditional path leading to the tea house is called roji, dewey ground, and comes from a Buddhist sutra which states, "There is no peace in the three worlds; they are like a house in flames," but upon enlightenment, one "emerges from the house in flames and sits on the dewey ground." Thus, the ceremony of tea is a spiritual one, which can lead practitioners to worldly understandings.

The tea house has a small door, so small that guests have to crawl inside, thus accentuating the feeling of separation from the petty thoughts and mundane considerations of the outside world. Inside, the small tea room is bare, with nothing more than a flower vase and a hanging scroll. Referred to as the abode of the unsymmetrical, it may look imperfect, but an appreciation of its beauty allows one to live in the present, to cast away the smaller self and understand the transcendent unity of all people and all things.

The acclaimed tea master Sen no Rikyu wrote:

House and dewy ground.

Guest and host both joined as one,

Share a cup of tea.

In tranquil meditation,

No margin divides their hearts.

Among the prized objects used in the tea ceremony, none is more valued than the tea bowl, and it is said that each bowl is a miniature universe. With countless styles and refined aesthetics, all who strive to understand its beauty will find works that speak to them. Besides the sky-blue and jade-green incised Chinese bowls, the beloved red and black Japanese raku ware, and the prized Korean ido and irabo pieces, there are many other beautiful styles, such as unglazed Bizen pieces, colored by ashen deposits, and partly-glazed Shigaraki works, which highlight the natural beauty of the rough clay hidden under smooth glaze. Hagi potters often leave patches of bare clay between the thick, white glaze that covers each piece. The bare clay suggests desert sands and sometimes contains small pebbles, boulders in the miniature landscape, which are covered by a snowy white glaze that hides all imperfections and echoes the impermanence of all things. See the miniature world in each tea bowl. Their beauty facilitates mindfulness and a refined awareness of details, and will lead beholders to harmonize with their surroundings.

Dr. Ken Jeremiah


Dr. Ken Jeremiah has written extensively about history, religion, and critical thinking. His books and articles are available worldwide, has written numerous books and articles, translated various works from Spanish, Italian, and Japanese. Dr. Ken Jeremiah has written extensively about history, religion, and critical thinking. His previous books include Remnants of a Distant Past, Christian Mummification, Living Buddhas, Aikido Ground Fighting, and he teaches world language and comparative religion courses.  Is a big honour for Onihagi he took place here. And for those who really love pottery world, please enjoy knowledge.

☆ My name is  Manuele ☆ Kanji : 真入得 瑠 ☆ Enter the Truth you Acquire Jewel ☆ Given name by a unique & special dear friend. A Nagasaki survivor ☆
☆ My name is Manuele ☆ Kanji : 真入得 瑠 ☆ Enter the Truth you Acquire Jewel ☆ Given name by a unique & special dear friend. A Nagasaki survivor ☆

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