Hongo Hideyuki Gold Chawan Safflower blooms tea bowl SPRING Solstice CUP JAPAN

23th season that start from 5/26 to 30 (may): Safflower blooms.
[Condition] It is an intact and complete product.
[Size] Diameter about 13.5cm Height about 10cm
From the 72-color gold bowl and the space, it is the 31st weather "warm wind blows".
It was created based on the theme of "a device that engraves the seventy-two seasons that change every five days". Based on the twenty-four years of energy born in ancient China, one year was divided into 72 equal parts every five days. Seventy-two seasons with the meaning of calendar.
Seventy-two weathers in Japan, which match the climate of Japan, represent changes in flora and fauna and weather in seventy-two short sentences, and the image is made using 22 types of glaze and gold leaf and gold solution, and the seasonal transition colors It was produced by expressing 72 in 72 bowls.
This work expresses the "Safflower blooms." which is one of the twenty-three of the three small Komans, and is full of safflower blooms. Is beautiful, and the artist's original view of the world, which is finished in a container shape with exquisite distortion, gives a great sense of artistry.It's a very modern piece, and it's a work that you can enjoy from various angles.
There is an "H" inscription on the hill. Comes with a box. 

800.00 €

Wide Awake In Japan


23. 紅花栄: "The Safflower Blooms"

 
Shichijuni-kou (72 Seasons) Calendar Listing
初夏 Shoka: "Early Summer"
Season No. 8: 小満, Shouman: 
"Grain Full" 
Shouman: the time of year when farmers can hope to see kernals forming in the "ears" of cereal crops such as wheat and barley. This sign allows them to heave a small sigh of relief, hence the term "shou-man," or "small satisfaction."
Climate No. 23: 紅花栄
Benibana Saku
"The Safflower Blooms"
(May 26 -May 30) 
"Eye brow brushes
Come to mind
Safflower blossoms." -Matsuo Basho

Back in Alaska, I once ordered a packet of safflower seeds from a California-based seed company and tried planting them
, completely disregarding the kind of soil or climate they would need. I didn't see any sprouts for the entire season and figured they were duds. But the following summer, I couldn't believe my eyes when I saw in my greenhouse a full-grown safflower right there in the dirt below the shelf where I had originally planted the seeds! Despite all odds, one grew for me! Talk about a survivor!
Safflower (Jpn: 紅花 beninbana, Carthamus tinctorius), has played an important role in Japan's art culture for centuries. Their densely-colored spiky flower heads of happy, reddish-orange and mustard yellow petals produce a fine crimson oil known as "Kyo-beni," which was once employed to color the lips of geishas. According to history, the deep red dye paste "kurenai" made from safflower was once so coveted by Japan's elite that it was said to be more precious than gold!
In greater demand today as a source of oil than a clothing dye, safflower cultivation still continues along the gentle, sloping mountainsides of Yamagata Prefecture. Set in rural Yamagata, the delightlfully realistic 1991 Ghibli animated film "Omohide Poroporo" (Eng: "Only Yesterday") features the story of a young Tokyoite woman who takes a summer off to pick safflower blossoms in the tempermental rains of early summer. The process of harvesting and processing safflower pulp is gorgeously illustrated in painstaking detail, giving the viewer a real sense of appreciation for all the hard work involved.

 The safflower seems particularly significant as a recurring theme in the movie, plain in appearance yet precious for its potential -symbolic of both the pain and beauty of life.
May I be as cheerful as the safflower in my own rainy seasons!

【More ahead with season】Bright red, orange and yellow safflowers in morning haze (July 7, 2016) The busiest season for safflower farmers has begun in Takase area,Yamagata-shi. Yamagata Prefecture. The farmers pick the flowers in early morning when the thorns surrounding the flowers and the leaves are softened by the morning dew. This way, they don’t get the thorns in their fingers.  The flowers are used to produce dye, and the picking season goes through until mid-July. There are safflower fields of approximately 4 hectares in total in Yamagata-shi, according to Agricultural Cooperative (JA) Yamagata.
【More ahead with season】Bright red, orange and yellow safflowers in morning haze (July 7, 2016) The busiest season for safflower farmers has begun in Takase area,Yamagata-shi. Yamagata Prefecture. The farmers pick the flowers in early morning when the thorns surrounding the flowers and the leaves are softened by the morning dew. This way, they don’t get the thorns in their fingers. The flowers are used to produce dye, and the picking season goes through until mid-July. There are safflower fields of approximately 4 hectares in total in Yamagata-shi, according to Agricultural Cooperative (JA) Yamagata.