KUMANO kurouemon 門 作 (1955-), aka The Bear of Echizen.demon Tenmoku bowl

KUMANO kurouemon  (1955-), aka The Bear of Echizen. demon Tenmoku bowl  Height 11.5cm Mouth diameter 13.4cm Trunk diameter cm Bottom diameter 8.1cm

3,000.00 €

さぞ嬉しいのである。
最後の階段まで
水と笑顔を持って来てくれた
小走りの亭主。
黒部宇奈月から、一汗も二汗も
かいた天険神謀の奧に
黒薙の湯宿がある。
今期最初の客らしい。
大自然の香の図が観たかった。
プレートが着離を繰り返し、出て来た本性。
赤が黒になり、青鼠色に冷固した岩頭。
大自然の事故跡地に
世世生かされている俺達。
泥砂に等しいこと気付かぬ俺達。
垂直の岩風体に、生まれ変わりを
吐き出すオレ。
空っぽは難しい。
雲で顔を洗うしか無いのか。
熊野九郎右ヱ門 

Kumano Kuroemon ( Abrief introduction  by Ken Jeremiah)

Shino pottery emerged in the 16th century in Mino Province, modern-day Gifu Prefecture, and is now world-famous due to its beauty. Made from durable clay, brushed with iron oxide, and covered with white glaze, its pieces are admired and valued. Some of the most valuable pieces are made by the enigmatic Kumano Kuroemon. Reclusive, he lives in the mountains near Echizen, Fukui Prefecture, where he has his own private kiln. Yearly, he scours the surrounding mountains for suitable clay, which he shapes into incredible bowls, vases, and more. After applying his own glaze variation, he fires them at an incredible 1520 degrees Celsius, often foregoing sleep for an entire week to constantly regulate the heat. Most artists would not think of firing a piece at such a high temperature, as it would cause pieces to buckle, distend, or lose their solidity. It renders most glazes useless. They become discolored and unsightly, or they just run off the clay. However, Kumano's pieces can withstand such heat. He uses a perfect combination of clay, glaze and temperature, which has a spiritual significance for him. The same temperature found inside a volcano, the kiln is the miniature volcanic environment in which the alchemical process of creation occurs. Kumano said, "I see fire as an amorphous being, one that can change into any shape. It is alive, and fears nothing. In a small space, like a kiln, it reveals its true power and essence." His approach, skill, and attention to the most important element in the creation of pottery, fire, leads to ineffable beauty. Paying attention to the wind, humidity, and the wood burned inside the kiln, Kumano waits outside, listening to the sounds echoing from within, and making adjustments when necessary. Inside, natural ash upon purplish clay produces an incredible array of reds and greens, cobalt and divine turquoise, all blending together harmoniously with characteristic white shino glaze. Living alone, and with no suitable successor, his pieces are one of a kind. Unique and without comparison, Kumano's works epitomize the beauty of modern Shino wares.

Ken Jeremiah has written numerous books and articles, and he has translated various works from Spanish, Italian, and Japanese. Dr. Ken Jeremiah has written extensively about history, religion, and critical thinking. His previous books include Remnants of a Distant Past, Christian Mummification, Living Buddhas, Aikido Ground Fighting, and If the Samurai Played Golf...Zen Strategies for a Winning Game. He teaches world language and comparative religion courses, and currently resides in Narragansett, RI.