Matsudaira Fumai 松平不昧 (1751) Mountain and the Clouds in the complete solitude of Mount FujiTea Bowl Chawan

Esaurito

12.4 cm large 8.6 cm high Lacquered "Mount Fuji" black tea cup "The appearance of Shirotae of Fuji is noble looked of the mountain above the clouds Hara"  box was written by Fumai Matsudaira That's genuine. Seikou Hiraki was a Japanese artist, from 1881 to 1973. Then march 1939. This letter has been guarantee by him.

0,00 €

しろたえの不二のすがたは山のわと 見えて気高き雲の上哉 

",Seeing the Noble white Fuji with the appearance of cherry trees above clouds of Hara " 

松平不昧matsudairafumai 公ōyake 撰sen 一閑張ikkanbari 茶碗chawan 冨士fuji

, The Mountain and the Clouds in the complete solitude of Mount Fuji

Lacquered "Mount Fuji" black tea cup "The appearance of Shirotae of Fuji is noble looked of the mountain above the clouds Hara" Matsudaira fumai (standing Han Hakogaki)

Derived from the Greek word "hara" meaning joy or pleasure, abouve clouds of Hara can be used to describe literally a "little pleasure". As such feeling equivalent to experiencing a little pleasures in life, as you lay down on the grass and watch the clouds on a spring afternoon.

The tea bowl picture has been decorated with lacquered papier-mache. This work, such as if the sacred Fuji has been incorporated reflects that seen in the closed of sankin-kōtai

Matsudaira Fumai selected this tea bowl called above Mt. Fuji. Kanji 一閑張 shows how to make this tea bowl., the used technique used, a Sort of lacquered papier-mache

Wooden box display 冨士

  1. (n) warrior (esp. of military retainers of daimyos in the Edo period); samurai
  2. A man in attendance (on a person of high standing); retainer
  3. Eventually means 冨士一~ Fujikazu ~
  4. "冨" wisteria wealth. "士" is samurai. "一" is one. 

しろたえ

shirotae white

不二のすがたは

Fuji template; model , pattern customary procedure

山のわと

山yama のわnowa とto The Quit Peace of Mountain Hill

見えて気高き

見えてmiete 気高きkedakaki

in front of the summit view / Seeing and Noble white Fuji view ..

雲の上哉

雲の上kumonōe 哉 Above the Clouds

Sankin-kōtai (参勤交代 "alternate attendance") was a policy of the Tokugawa shogunate during most of the Edo period of Japanese history.[1] The purpose was to strengthen central control over the daimyōs (major feudal lords). It required feudal lords, daimyō, to alternate living for a year in their domain and in Edo, the capital.


折紙 - くろ一閑張冨士絵茶碗 - 朱漆花押箱書共 - 松平不昧公 - 右真物に - 相違なき者也 - 己卯弥生 - 平木清光 

Black 一閑張 tea bowl with Mt. Fuji Both the red signature and the writing on the box was written by Fumai Matsudaira That's genuine. 1939 March Seikou Hiraki 己卯 shows a year.  Seikou Hiraki was a Japanese artist, from 1881 to 1973. Then the year is 1939. 弥生 is March.  This letter is a guarantee by expert, Seikou Hiraki.

Certified Letter Written on march 1939 by Seikou Hiraki

The tea bowl picture has been decorated with lacquered papier-mache. This work, such as if the sacred Fuji has been incorporated reflects that seen in the closed of sankin-kōtai
Matsudaira Fumai selected this tea bowl called above Mt. Fuji. Kanji 一閑張 shows how to make this tea bowl., the used technique used, a Sort of lacquered papier-mache
This Tea Bowl survived to the Sankin-kōtai (参勤交代 "alternate attendance") was a policy of the Tokugawa shogunate during most of the Edo period of Japanese history.The purpose was to strengthen central control over the daimyōs (major feudal lords). It required feudal lords, daimyō, to alternate living for a year in their domain and in Edo, the capital.During the Edo period (1603-1868), when local lords (daimyō) traveled around their domain with their retinue, they appointed in each town a powerful family that was requested to provide them accommodation in their residence. Serving as official inns, these residences were known as honjin. They were larger than regular residences and displayed refined decoration. The many examples of tea utensils featured in the museums are a legacy of Lord Matsudaira Fumai's deep interest for chanoyu, the Japanese tea ceremony. During tea gatherings many forms of art come into play, including ceramic, lacquer, bamboo, iron casting, scroll painting and calligraphy


MEANING
(The appearance of Shirotae of Fuji, is a noble look of the mountain above the clouds of Hara) box was written by Fumai Matsudaira guaranteed by famous japanese artist Seikou Hiraki (1881 to 1973) on certified Letter Written on march 1939.


しろたえの不二のすがたは山のわと 見えて気高き雲の上哉


Derived from the Greek word "hara" meaning joy or pleasure, above clouds of Hara can be used to describe literally a "little pleasure". As such feeling equivalent to experiencing a little pleasures in life, as you lay down on the grass and watch the clouds on a spring afternoon.
From the middle to the late Edo period Fumai was the seventh generation of the Matsue Clan. One of the first ancestors of the tea ceremony and famous as a representative of the Edo period. At that time the Matsue Clan had a financial failure, and it was rumored "the roar will probably die", due to the crisis, with members of the Clan under the leadership of the new government reform Fumai tried to financially promote all flood control of the area wih the the development of new rice fields, in terms to produce special products with high commercial value such as iron, paper, ginseng. By promoting local industries to produce new goods, he managed to make finances slightly better. After that, however, the financial situation deteriorated again as all the finances were dispersed and used for the collection of cheap and expensive tea utensils, also known to the tea people. Matsudaira himself began to reform again, but he died at the age of 68, retiring without improving his finances.
He was well known for collecting tea ceremony objects, and he designed the Meimei-an Tea house northeast of Matsue Cast. When he took office, rumors were spreading about the Matsudaira clan soon losing power because of their terrible financial situation. He therefore enforced several strict budgetary measures and had the region focus on raising and using local products, such as ginseng and cotton. He encouraged thriftiness among the common people, and is credited with introducing Bote-Bote Cha to the local diet to make the most of limited food resources.


AROUND 2018 HAS BEEN CELEBRATED THE 200 YEARS ANNIVERSARY BY HIS DEAD. HE'S ALSO FAMOUS TO BUILD A TEA ROOM:


The hermitage of Meimei
The tea room of the ancient hermitage of Meimei was built by Fumaiko, nickname of the daimyo Harusato Matsudaira, a famous tea master, in the residence of the Arisawa family, in the then feud of Matsue. The tea room played a central role in the hermitage.
Once the hall was dismantled and rebuilt in the Tokyo residence of the Matsudaira family, but then it was decided to return it to the Izumo prefecture; it was later rebuilt, in 1928, in the hermitage of Kanden, near the Kogetsu-tei, in Haginodai. In 1966, on the occasion of the 150th anniversary of Fumaiko's retreat, the hall was moved to Sekizan, in Shiominawate, where it is still today. From this position you can enjoy the view of the tower of the castle of Matsue.


The building has a sloping thatched roof, and at the entrance hangs an image bearing the inscription "Meimei-an", with Fumaiko's calligraphy. Inside the tea room one can perceive the taste of Fumaiko, captured in the style with which it was furnished.


From Meimei-an you can also admire the garden while enjoying the maccha (ceremony green tea). Since the Matsue area is prominent in Japan for its tea culture and for the netsuke (small finely carved objects that were placed on the clothes), it is said that it was Fumaiko who propagated these customs. The hermitage of Meimei is a representative place of Matsue.


Matsudaira Harusato was renowned as a tea master, under the name Matsudaira Fumai Harusato was born at the Matsudaira residence in Edo (present-day Tokyo) in 1751,[2] the second son of Matsudaira Munenobu, who then ruled Matsue. Harusato succeeded his father, Munenobu, as lord of the Izumo Matsue fief when his father, the 6th-generation lord of the fief, retired in the 6th year of the Meiwa era (1769).By then, due largely to contributions ordered by the bakufu for the repair of Enryaku-Ji temple, the fief had been reduced to a state of poverty. With the support of his chief retainer, Asahi Tamba, Harusato set about reversing the situation quickly by increasing production of the fief's major products and making the rice paddy area of the fief more secure by the promotion of flood control. These efforts met with success, and the Izumo Matsue fief was among the fastest to accomplish reform.


In terms of the history of the Japanese Tea Ceremony , with the advent of the Tokugawa period in 1615, the fashion of samurai personally practicing chanoyu lost its attraction; chanoyu lost its function as a focal point for political ties among the samurai. From about the middle of the 18th century, however, the old-guard samurai who had scorned chanoyu as the idle game of indolent men of leisure had died. By this time, many of the new generation of daimyōs were rising as leaders in the development of urban culture. Matsudaira Harusato was outstanding among them.


As he was early into his mission of restoring the finances and government of his fief, Harusato in 1770 wrote a treatise titled Mudagoto [Useless words], apparently in opposition to his main retainer Asahi Tanba who criticized him for use of fief funds toward chanoyu. In the Mudagoto, Harusato states: "Making chanoyu a luxury, exhausting beauty to make it splendid is a distressful thing ... rather, it can be made an adjutant to governing the country well.


His chanoyu mentor was Isa Kōtaku (1684-1745), a disciple of the Rinzai Zen monk Ikei Sōetsu (253rd abbot of Daitokuji temple, Kyoto, and later, founder of Kōgen'in temple in Edo [Tokyo]), who was in turn a disciple of the daimyō and chanoyu master Katagiri Sadamasa Sekishū (1605-73). He was also privy to a copy of the Nanpōroku (南方録) record of the chanoyu teachings of Sen no Rikyu, from Arai Itsushō (1726-1804), who was a tea devotee in Edo in the chanoyu tradition of Hosokawa Tadaoki (a.k.a. Hosokawa Sansai).
In the last half of the Edo period, outstanding tea devotees appeared from the daimyo class. Matsudaira Fumai and Ii Naosuke are representative of these. Matsudaira Fumai was the lord Matsue castle in Izumo. His name was Harusato and his Buddhist name was Bioan. He revolutionized the administrative system of the Matsue clan which was in financial difficulties and put it back on its feet. With the money that he had to spare he created a large collection of tea utensils. In his younger years he was critical of chonoyu.
In order to go beyond the existing chanoyu and clear the way for a new one Fumai went ahead with an independent study of chanoyu utensils.


The result of this was 'Kokon Meibutsu Ruiju' (Classified Collection of Famous Utensils of Ancient and Modern Times) in 18 volumes.
In this work the shape and size of meibutsu are described in detail and they are divided into the categories of omeibutsu (lit. 'great famous utensils'), and chukomeibutsu ('rediscovered famous utensils').
With this study of meibutsu as a background, Fumai made a collection of tea utensils totalling about 800 as recorded in the Unshu Kuracho.
These utensils are today still known as Unshu Meibutsu and are highly prized.
This chanoyu of Fumai had a great influence on the tea devotees of the world of finance in the modern age.
Ii Naosuke was a daimyo with land producing 300,000 goku (one koku is about 180 litres) of rice in Hikone. He is famous as the chief minister who led the opening of Japan to the outside world. Naosuke moved at a single stroke from the obscurity of his youth to being the head of the Ii family and then the centre of the shogunate government. He was consistently passionate about chanoyu from his youth and in the midst of a busy life as a statesman never forgot to devote his spare moments to chanoyu.
In Ansei 4 (1857) he completed the compilation of chanoyu studies 'Chanoyu Ichie Shu' (Collection on the Oneness of Chanoyu). In the Ichie Shu the desirable mental attitude for a chakai tea gathering is spoken of, which is ichigo ichie. Ichigo ichie means once in a lifetime. Naosuke teaches us that we should attend the chakai with the earnestness of our knowledge that this chakai can never be experienced again. Also after the chakai we should drink tea alone so that dokuza kannen (solitary contemplation) becomes a part of chanoyu. This also appears in 'Chanoyu Ichie Shu'. The distinctive feature of Naosuke's chanoyu is its earnest pursuit of this mental attitude.