NENJU O JUZU (数珠) O JUZU PRAYER BEADS OF JODO PURELAND SECT ROKUMANBEN GURI NIKKA

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NENJU O JUZU (数珠) O JUZU PRAYER BEADS OF JODO PURELAND SECT ROKUMANBEN GURI NIKKA

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Let me report on the mysterious metal ring found in the "Soto-shu" Juzu (Mala) style. Represents the void (not to be confused with a "zero"!), Crossing the 108 virtues and contaminations .. and on a more practical level, it is a counter so you don't lose your place while singing the beads (it's not a big one practice Soto, but some do). It is also found on Joto (Pure Land) Juzu for this reason. 

Jo do shu (the Pure Land sect) style:

  • Oyadama Buddha bead - material: rich fragrant wood(origin: japan) size 15 mm
  • Omodama counter body beads: rich fragrant lwood(origin: japan) size 11 mm
  • Deshidama beads-material:rich fragrant wood(origin: japan)

Silk cord tassels / woven hand-made balls: custom color

Gift Box: paulownia wood

This kind of Juzu(nikka or: rokumanben guri nikka) is one of popular Jōdo Shū(Pure Land Sect) Juzu -

Designed for counting 60,000 recitations of the nembutsu. This juzu consists of two loops - one

loop with forty beads and a parent bead (called an oyadama); and one loop with twenty-seven beads

interspaced with small beads and one oyadama. This second loop has a floating metal ring to which

two tassels are attached - one with ten flat beads; and one with six small round beads.

Jodo shu
Jodo shu (Pure Land school) has four different kinds of juzu. One, for example, known as a hyakumanben is a huge 'communal' juzu used by the whole congregation who, sitting in a circle, all hold the juzu which is rotated in a clockwise direction, with each person passing the beads from their right hand to their left.
A second juzu, known as the nikka (or: rokumanben guri nikka) - designed for counting 60,000 recitations of the nembutsu - is shown here. This juzu consists of two loops - one loop with forty beads and a parent bead (called an oyadama); and one loop with twenty-seven beads interspaced with small beads and one oyadama.
This second loop has a floating metal ring to which two tassles are attached - one with ten flat beads; and one with six small round beads.
The juzu is held in the left hand with the twenty-seven bead loop held between the index and middle fingers and the other loop between index finger and thumb.
This juzu is either carried hung on the left wrist or held in the left hand. When the hands are held in gassho (prayer position) this juzu is draped over the thumbs and allowed to hang between the wrists.

Image is related to a Jodo shu "Juzu" 浄土宗用Jodo shu (Pure Land school) has four different kinds of juzu. One, for example, known as a hyakumanben is a huge 'communal' juzuused by the whole congregation who, sitting in a circle, all hold the juzu which is rotated in a clockwise direction, with each person passing the beads from their right hand to their left.
A second juzu, /Images above) is known as the nikka (or: rokumanben guri nikka) - designed for counting 60,000 recitations of the nembutsu - is shown here. This juzu consists of two loops - one loop with forty beads and a parent bead (called an oyadama); and one loop with twenty-seven beads interspaced with small beads and one oyadama.
This second loop has a floating metal ring to which two tassles are attached - one with ten flat beads; and one with six small round beads. Please refer to James Deacon's page Link button in terms to read carefully.

This is a Japanese wooden Buddhist prayer beads for ZEN (Soto Zen). Beads are made of natural woods. It's called "Juzu" in Japanese. This type of Juzu is used for Soto Zen. It has a metal ring.

Wearing Buddha beads reminds one to pay attention to one's daily actions. Reciting the Buddha's name signifies eliminating one's vexation. One can recite as many times as one wishes but the important thing is to focus while one is reciting.

Buddhist prayer beads or malas (Sanskrit: mālā "garland") are a traditional tool used to count the number of times a mantra is recited, breaths while meditating. Juzu beads match sometimes different description and most of the times depends by the temple or eventually the priest.