Sasaki Shoraku 「雨雲」"Rain Clouds" Kuro Raku-yaki Chawan 'Amagumo' (clouds to bring the rain) tea bowl

Out of stock

'Amagumo' (clouds to bring the rain) tea bowl  

This wonderful Kuro Raku-yaki Chawan (black raku tea bowl) part of the collection of a Japanese master-calligrapher also known for his pottery. This particular bowl is called "RAIN CLOUDS" made by Sasaki Shoraku.

8.5 x 11.3cm approx SUPREME NEW CONDITIONS

280.00 €

Amagumo (雨雲 "clouds to bring the rain")  can also be confused with  Murakumo (叢 雲  "Cluster of Clouds") 

as Shichiri can be confused with Shigure 時雨 drizzle, shower in late autumn (fall) or early winter

Made by Shouraku Sasaki at Shouraku Kiln.
Shouraku Kiln, opened in 1903, is one of the most traditional Raku Yaki Kilns in Kyoto. Shouraku Sasaki is the third generation of family artisans at the kiln.

This AMAGUMO matcha bowl is created after the original by Kohetsu Honami (1558 to 1637), one of the three great ancestors of Raku Yaki. (For more information, pleae click here.)
It is said that AMAGUMO is the work most representative of his individual and unique style. High quality duplication traditionally has been admired for established Japanese ceramics since creating high quality duplication requires extremely skilled and broad-based techniques in all aspects of creation, and often compels the artisan to meticulously recreate an atmosphere which often was created on accident by the original artisan. Only a few artisans can duplicate historical treasured arts of Raku Yaki.

Around the upper rim of this piece, thickness is deliberately erratic, as is the fluctuation in height. The name "AMAGUMO" means rain cloud. Black glaze is thickly poured except for some parts, mouth, and parts of side and bottom. On the front side the surface appears as though the glaze has been whittled away. It looks like rain cloud, so that this piece is named "AMAGUMO" for the scene. The surface not covered by black glaze looks coarse and rough like ancient sandstone, a very unique and pleasing texture.

The art of Kohetsu Honami, characterized by free thinking and uniqueness of form, has mesmerized audiences in Japan and around the world for hundreds of years, throughout the history of Raku Yaki. Third-generation artisan Shouraku Sasaki of one of the most traditional Raku Yaki Kilns in Kyoto is the ideal individual to re-awaken this treasured creation into the present day.

Kohetsu Honami (1558 to 1637)

Kohetsu Honami was not only an exquisite pottery artist but one of three great calligraphers in Japanese history. He was born to the Honami family whose business over many generations was finishing swords. He took delight in elegant pursuits throughout his life and uninhibitedly created his art by his own true feelings and desires.
His art which is characterized by free thinking and uniqueness of form has mesmerized audiences in Japan and around the world for hundreds of years.

Shouraku Sasaki

This wonderful Kuro Raku-yaki Chawan (black raku tea bowl) was part of the collection of a Japanese master-calligrapher also known for his pottery. As usual ONIHAGI  present you a very diverse selection of his chawan and tea utensils. This particular bowl was made by THIRD III generation named Sasaki Shoraku, born in 1944, potter from Kyoto. His kiln was established near the world known Kiyomizu temple in eastern Kyoto by the founder of the Shoraku lineage. In 1945, it was moved to Kameoka, near the Kyoto Yada shrine, whose head priest gave Shoraku his name. That is the kiln the famous mystic and artist Deguchi Onisaburo (1871-1948) used to make his spectacular Raku tea bowls. The current Shoraku inherited that name from his father in 1962.

The bowl is  named "RAIN CLOUDS" an exceptional tea bowls considered embodiments of the maker's spirit. 

In 1905, Shoraku's grandfather, the Nishikide decoration master Kichinosuke Sasaki, opened the Shoraku Kiln in front of the gates of Kiyomizu-dera Temple with the plan of making raku ware, only to later relocate the business to the valley of Kameoka, Kyoto. The Shoraku Kiln has taught three generations up until now. Shouaku, the second oldest son, together with the the third oldest son, continues to make pottery while gathering research on raku ware. He is also active as the purveyor of Daitoku-ji Temple.

Momoyama period fans know well Hon'ami Kōetsu who was a producer who developed the Kozato art village and created various tea tools and arts and crafts. Here you can take a look of a classic Hon'ami Kōetsu view rainy cloud and this bowl captures the essence of a scenery that changes to his skin bowl rounded with a distinctive glow, and finished in a so-called sock-like style. Overwhelming presence is transmitted in terms to have an extremely unique result.

Please let us know if you have some questions.

The chawan is signed and in excellent condition. It will be shipped in a box that bears the signature and the seal of Sasaki Shoraku.
Dimensions: 11.3 x 8.5 cm 

This tea bowl is one of the 7 representative Koetsu tea bowls called Koestu Shichishu, actually still exists at a museum as one of important cultural properties
This tea bowl is one of the 7 representative Koetsu tea bowls called Koestu Shichishu, actually still exists at a museum as one of important cultural properties