TEA POT KYUSU KYO WARE YAKY JAPAN 森正 MORI 2015 Masaki color CLAY new BOX KYOTO

Height 10.6 cm Caliber 3.3 cm Body diameter 9.8 cm

350.00 €

This is a work by popular writer, Tadashi Mori, who is BORN in Mie. It is a talented person who has been awarded domestically and overseas. It has a good reputation not only for molding but also for the texture of glaze. Drawn with a unique brushwork has a great presence like a painting.

Tadashi Mori 森 正
A
bstracted Passion, an exhibition 2002 of extraordinary tea bowls and incense burners by Mori Tadashi, is the first major show of this artist in America. Mori Tadashi (b. 1940) has been a driving force behind the contemporary ceramic movement in Japan. As a young man, Mori aspired to be a sculptor. He worked as a designer in the Yokkaichi ceramic factory. That position allowed him to develop new ceramic designs and decorative glazes. He was strongly influenced by Hineno Sakuzo, a renowned designer who advocated functional design. Hineno, who was very impressed by Mori's originality and artistic freedom, once commented that Mori had the magical power to draw the audience into a mysterious world.
In 1964, Mori attended the International Exhibition of Contemporary Ceramic Art at the National Museum of Modern Art in Japan, which introduced work by contemporary American ceramic artists. Mori was so inspired by the freedom of American ceramists that he decided to explore new directions in his own work. Drawing on his considerable knowledge in ceramic design and glazes, he began to experiment with free-spirited forms and decorations.
In the early 1970s, Mori resigned from his job at the Yokkaichi ceramic factory and traveled to Rome, Italy. He wanted to experience the art and culture of another ancient civilization, the center of European art renaissance. Amid magnificent architecture and colors, he realized that human beings need the nourishment from culture and art. Upon returning to Japan, he decided to work as a full-time artist, immersing himself in creating and exhibiting original work, for which he received many awards.
Mori's interest in other cultures further took him to Thailand. Since 1977, he had studied Thai folk art and traveled to Thailand through a Japan-Thailand cultural exchange program. Some of Mori's most important work, including his monumental pieces entitled "Women Who Like to Whisper", could trace their aesthetic influence to his exposure to international arts. Mori emphasizes spontaneity and freedom in his work. By merging free-spirited forms with bold decorations using traditional Japanese glazes, he has been charting a unique course among contemporary Japanese ceramists. Mori's work exhibits complex personalities without appearing contrived. His pieces often seem to bridge functional forms and art, sculpture and painting, Eastern and Western aesthetics.
In 1997, Mori was selected among twenty-one noted Japanese artists profiled in a book entitled "Toward a 21st Century Renaissance in Ceramics" (Dohosha Ltd. publisher), in recognition to their contributions to contemporary Japanese ceramics. Peter Voulkos (1924-2002), one of the American ceramists in the 1965 Japan exhibition, wrote in this volume: "Their commitment is very ambitious and (their) risk taking generates an excitement that at once transcends the boundaries that have constrained the development of new ideas and possibilities that ceramics can afford." It is a fitting tribute to these Japanese artists whom Voulkos and his peers once inspired. The current show, featuring a spectacular collection of extraordinary tea bowls and incense burners, offers a rare opportunity for international audience to experience the "magic" of this creative artist.


2012 "Exuberance" - Extraordinary ceramic art of Tadashi Mori 森 正

Touching Stone Gallery is privileged and honored to show this collection of work by Tadashi Mori, one of the most important contemporary ceramic artists in Japan.

Tadashi Mori (b. 1940) grew up right after the Second World War, when Japan was exposed to strong influence from the West. As a young man, he looked towards Europe for inspirations. Working as a designer in Se-ei Ceramic Yokkaichi Factory, Mori gained recognition for his original works in the 1960s. He was strongly influenced by Hineno Sakuzo, a leading proponent of contemporary ceramic design. Hineno once commented that Mori had the magical power to draw the audience into a mysterious world.

Eager to experience the art and culture that started the Renaissance, Mori resigned from his job in 1970 and traveled to Rome, Italy. Roaming through the magnificent architecture of another ancient civilization, he realized how much humans need nourishment from culture and art. Upon returning to Japan, he became a full-time artist, creating original ceramic art for which he received numerous awards. In 1973, he received a Special Award in Asahi Ceramic Exhibition for his work entitled "Women Who Like to Gossip". That was followed by two more Special Awards in the 1975 and 1976 Chunichi International Ceramic Exhibitions for his works "Talkative Lady B" and "Cold Frosty Women", respectively. The latter work traveled to Italy in 1976 on invitation by the Faenza International Ceramic Exhibition.

Tadashi Mori outside his studio
(Photo courtesy of Paramita Museum) 

Between 1973 and 1993, Mori also served as an instructor for the Nagoya Ceramic Club, whose membership read like who is who in the financial and cultural circles of the time. Mori considers that time an important period for him to 'grow as a human being'. His interest in foreign cultures prompted him to study Thai folk art and travel to Thailand through a Japan-Thailand cultural exchange program. Some of Mori's most important works are an amalgam of unique multicultural perspectives.

1985 marked an important turn in Mori's career. He established his studio and kiln in a beautiful hillside location in Komono-Cho. His artistic focus shifted from the West back towards Japan. Since the 1990s, he produced series after series of highly original works that could rightfully be called artistic tour de force - the "Kanzashi" and "Matoi" series inspired by Japanese woman's hair-pins, the "Enku" series in honor of the 16th-century Japanese Zen monk Enku, the "Tale of Genji" series that paid homage to the Heian period Japanese classic. Despite the diverse themes of his works, a common hallmark is a sense of speed and freedom, as if each piece was created in an instant with one sweeping gesture - spontaneous, irrepressible, irreproducible.

In 1997, in recognition to his contributions to contemporary Japanese ceramic art, Mori was selected among twenty-one Japanese artists profiled in the title "Toward a 21st Century Renaissance in Ceramics" (Dohosha Ltd. publisher). Peter Voulkos (1924-2002), known for pushing ceramic craft in American to an art form, wrote in this volume: "Their commitment is very ambitious and (their) risk taking generates an excitement that at once transcends the boundaries that have constrained the development of new ideas and possibilities that ceramics can afford."

Such creativity did not go un-noticed. In 2004 and 2005, Mori launched two spectacular exhibitions entitled "Abstracted Passion" and "Enku" in Touching Stone Gallery in Santa Fe, America. In 2008, his "Tale of Genji" was exhibited in the Daikakuji Temple in Kyoto, Japan. In 2010, he was invited to exhibit in Paris, France. The following year, he was nominated as a member of International Academy of Ceramic; and he held another major exhibition in 2011 in Mullen, France.

In 2012, Mori's long artistic endeavor cumulated in a retrospective exhibition in Paramita Museum, Japan. That exhibition, entitled "Exuberant Forms - Fifty-year Trajectory of Tadashi Mori's Ceramic Art", included nearly three hundred pieces spanning Mori's entire career. It is hard to overstate the significance of his contributions to contemporary ceramic art in Japan.

The current show, featuring Mori's new works and selected pieces from his recent retrospective exhibition, provides a glimpse of the genius of this extraordinary artist.


Chronology
1940 Born in Yokkaichi, Mie Prefecture
1958 Graduated from ceramic department, Yokkaichi Technical High School
Designer in Yokkaichi ceramic factory
1964 Founding member and representative of the DAC potters group
1968 Established studio Tadashi Craft
1973 Founding member of the Nagoya Togei Club
1977 Studied Thai folk art through Japan-Thailand cultural exchange program
1980 Released Song of Summer Grass, a documentary film on Mori's ceramic art
1982 Visited sites in Thailand through Japan-Thailand cultural exchange program
1983 Studied the tea ceremony
1985 Established current studio in Sugitani, Komono-cho
Solo Exhibitions
1964 Imai Gallery, Osaka
1983-89 Imai Department Store, Sapporo
Gallery Cryness, Sendai
Kawamoto-Ichibankan, Morioka
Ikebukuro Seibu, Tokyo
Akasaka Inui Gallery, Tokyo
Garando Gallery, Nagoya
Maruzen Gallery, Nagoya
Daimaru, Osaka & Kochi
Horodo, Osaka
Marukoshi Department Store, Kanazawa
Tosenbo, Kyoto
Gallery Maronie, Kyoto
1990 Shibuya Seibu, Tokyo
Akasaka Inui Gallery
1991 Narita Hotel, Chiba
1992 Yama Gallery, Yokkaichi
Maruei, Nagoya
1993 Akasaka Inui Gallery
Mitsukoshi Nihonbashi Main Store, Tokyo
Maruei, Toyohashi
1994 Hanamido, Kawagoe
Isetan, Tokyo
1995 Hanamido, Kawagoe
Maruei, Nagoya
1996 Gallery Tosoan, Nagoya
Ashikaga Inui Gallery, Ashikaga
Horodo, Nagoya International Hotel
1997 Rokujuen, Tsushima
1998 Maruei, Toyohashi
Hashimoto Bijutsu, Nagoya
Ashikaga Inui Gallery, Ashikaga
1999 Maruei, Nagoya
Ashikaga Inui Gallery, Ashikaga
2000 Maruei, Toyohashi
Hashimoto Bijutsu, Nagoya
Ashikaga Inui Gallery, Ashikaga
2001 Maruei, Toyohashi
Akasaka Inui Gallery, Tokyo
2002 Hashimoto Bijutsu, Nagoya
Akasaka Inui Gallery, Tokyo
2003 Maruei, Nagoya
Hashimoto Bijutsu, Nagoya
Akasaka Inui Gallery, Tokyo
2004 Hashimoto Bijutsu, Nagoya
Touching Stone Gallery, Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA
2005 Touching Stone Gallery, Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA
Major Group Exhibitions
1976 Faenza International Ceramic Exhibition, Italy
1990 Senshukai, Hotel Okura, Tokyo
Meme-Pool Exhibition, Tokyo Ohara Center
Symposium for Amusement, Saitoan, Hagi
1993 Toh Kaigi 6, Mie Prefectural Museum of Art, Tsu
1994 Toh Kaigi 6, Mie Prefectural Museum of Art, Shizuoka Prefectural Museum of Art
Awards / Selected Publications
1962 Governor of Mie Prize (twice), crafts department of Mie Arts Exhibition
Chairman of Parliament Prize, crafts department of Mie Arts Exhibition
1963 Governor of Aichi Prize, First Asahi Ceramic Arts Exhibition
Second Prize, Japan Ceramic Design Competition
1964-70 Silver Prize, Japan Fiber Design Competition
Copper Prize (twice), Japan Fiber Design Competition
1972 Encouragement Prize, Asahi Ceramic Arts Exhibition
1973 Special Prize (Kawasaki Prize), Asahi Ceramic Arts Exhibition
1975 Special Prize, Chunichi International Ceramic Arts Exhibition
1976 Governor of Aichi Prize, Chunichi International Ceramic Arts Exhibition
1979 Encouragement Prize, Asahi Ceramic Arts Exhibition
1997 Toward a 21st Century Renaissance in Ceramics, Dohosha Ltd. Publisher
2007 "Enku". Ceramics Art & Perception vol. 66, p.30-32.

Public Collections
Okushino Sekitei, Ise All Nipon Airline Hotel, Osaka Taikoen, Osaka Hokke Building, Nobeoka Chinzanso, Tokyo Winghill House, Nikko Narita Hotel, Chiba Nagoya International Hotel Rokujuen, Tsushima