YEIRAKU OF OWARI Chion-in Temple kyusu Eirakuya 14th / Eiraku Tokuzen (1853-1909)

30.04.2021
14th Eiraku Zengoro (Myozen)   Jōdo Shū Chio in Jōdo Shū (Pure Land Sect) practice revolves around chanting Namu Amida Butsu (I entrust myself to Amida). The most basic chanting method is called the jūnen (chanting ten times). Here is how to do it: first, chant namu amida bu eight times and then catch your breath. Then, chant namu amida butsu namu amida bu, and then lower your head on the last recitation. By the way, although it is customary to clap your hands at a Shinto shrine, this is not done at a Buddhist temple.
14th Eiraku Zengoro (Myozen) Jōdo Shū Chio in Jōdo Shū (Pure Land Sect) practice revolves around chanting Namu Amida Butsu (I entrust myself to Amida). The most basic chanting method is called the jūnen (chanting ten times). Here is how to do it: first, chant namu amida bu eight times and then catch your breath. Then, chant namu amida butsu namu amida bu, and then lower your head on the last recitation. By the way, although it is customary to clap your hands at a Shinto shrine, this is not done at a Buddhist temple.

Eiraku Myozen-14th  (1852-1927) Real name: Yugo: Myozen

She was a Senke craftsman for the 10 generation. After the death of his husband Toku, she named herself Zengoro 14th (even very late)  and protected her family business, and made an effort to raise Zengoro 15th. In 1914 (Taisho 3), she received the issue of "Myozen" from Mitsui Takatoshi & because of that She has stamped the seal of Tokuzen 14th  the letter "Yu" given by Takayasu Koshibaan Mitsui. 

She often makes things that she likes, leaving her feminine and elegant works.

▼ Origin ▼

Known as [Oyu-san]she was born in Kyoto Prefecture / Nagaokakyo City in 1852, and she was 20 years old when married Eiraku Tokuzen (1853-1909).

After the death of her Husband in 1909, the family business of [Eiraku] was in the hands of her for over 19 years. Eiraku Family was not economically blessed and she tried so hard to support the family even in poverty. His husband Eiraku Tokuzen was very familiar with "Cha no Yu". , Stopping "Waka" and devoted himself to maintaining the household budget of [Eirakuya], much as possible.

She inherited the family business for nineteen years from 1909 (Meiji 42) to 1927, and together with "Jisaburo her nephew Eirakuya 15th / Eiraku Shozen (1880-1932) ")", she laid the foundation for the current [Eirakuya today].

After these bad times, the tea ceremony world also entered into a new prosperity, and received many orders for tea pottery from each Iemoto pan at Urasenke, including the "favorite food" of "Omotesenke 12th generation / Eiraku Myozen (1863-1937)". The poverty of Eirakuya Family has come to an end, and in the later years of she finally entered as 14th generation for real. After this succesfull results she retired and "Jisaburo", her nephew became "Eirakuya 15th / Eiraku". Who was planning later to take the name of Zengoro, she died in 1927.

14 "Owari's Eiraku Mark. From a porcelain specimen made in Owari by him"
14 "Owari's Eiraku Mark. From a porcelain specimen made in Owari by him"

▼ Origin ▼

Eirakuya 14th / Eiraku Tokuzen (1853-1909)"

▼ Achievements ▼

Known as [Oyu-san], [Eiraku Myozen 14th (1852-1927)] was born in Kyoto Prefecture / Nagaokakyo City in 1852, and she was 20 years old when married Eiraku Tokuzen (1853-1909).

After the death of her Husband Eiraku Tokuzen in 1909, the family business of [Eiraku] was in the hands of her for over 19 years.

Eiraku Family was not economically blessed and she tried so hard to support the family even in poverty. His husmand Eiraku Tokuzen was very familiar with "Cha no Yu". , Stopping "Waka" and devoted himself to maintaining the household budget of [Eirakuya], much as possible.

She inherited the family business for nineteen years from 1909 (Meiji 42) to 1927, and together with "Jisaburo her nephew Eirakuya 15th / Eiraku Shozen (1880-1932) ")", she laid the foundation for the current [Eirakuya today].

After these bad times, the tea ceremony world also entered into a new prosperity, and received many orders for tea pottery from each Iemoto pan at Urasenke, including the "favorite food" of "Omotesenke 12th generation / Eiraku Myozen (1863-1937)". The poverty of Eirakuya Family has come to an end, and in the later years of she finally entered as 14th generation for real. After this succesfull results she retired and "Jisaburo", her nephew became "Eirakuya 15th / Eiraku". Who was planning later to take the name of Zengoro, she died in 1927.

Overview
Overview
14 \ 永楽,製作者の印/(Yei-raku, the seal of the maker.)
14 \ 永楽,製作者の印/(Yei-raku, the seal of the maker.)
Chion-in  Located in the Higashiyama district of Kyoto, Chion-in is connected to Hōnen (1133-1212), the founder of the Jōdo Shū (Pure Land Sect) of Buddhism. It was here at Chion-in that Hōnen taught chanting the name of Amida (Sanskrit: Amitabha) to attain salvation, and it was here that he spent his final years. Today, with over 7,000 temples, the teachings of Hōnen have spread throughout Japan. Since 1523, Chion-in has been the head temple of the Jōdo Shū.  Also, Chion-in is highly appealing from a cultural standpoint, since it received donations from the Tokugawa shogun (supreme military commander) during the early Edo (1600-1867) period, and was built by the master artisans of the day.
Chion-in Located in the Higashiyama district of Kyoto, Chion-in is connected to Hōnen (1133-1212), the founder of the Jōdo Shū (Pure Land Sect) of Buddhism. It was here at Chion-in that Hōnen taught chanting the name of Amida (Sanskrit: Amitabha) to attain salvation, and it was here that he spent his final years. Today, with over 7,000 temples, the teachings of Hōnen have spread throughout Japan. Since 1523, Chion-in has been the head temple of the Jōdo Shū. Also, Chion-in is highly appealing from a cultural standpoint, since it received donations from the Tokugawa shogun (supreme military commander) during the early Edo (1600-1867) period, and was built by the master artisans of the day.
SanmonMain Gate, National Treasure he Sanmon was erected in 1621 by Tokugawa Hidetada, the second Tokugawa shogun and it has a height of about 24 meters, a width of about 50 meters, and about 70,000 roof tiles. This is one of the largest wooden tower gates in existence in Japan. The atmosphere in this tower gate is one of solemn magnificence, as it houses a Buddhist worship hall and images of Shakamuni Buddha and sixteen of his disciples. Also, the ceiling, beams, and pillars have images of heavenly maidens and flying dragons depicted in brilliant colors.  Normally, the inside of the gate is not open to the general public, but when it is opened for special viewings, visitors can see the Shiraki-no-hitsugi (the Plain wood coffins), one of Chion-in’s seven wonders and the glorious adornments in their brilliant colors.
SanmonMain Gate, National Treasure he Sanmon was erected in 1621 by Tokugawa Hidetada, the second Tokugawa shogun and it has a height of about 24 meters, a width of about 50 meters, and about 70,000 roof tiles. This is one of the largest wooden tower gates in existence in Japan. The atmosphere in this tower gate is one of solemn magnificence, as it houses a Buddhist worship hall and images of Shakamuni Buddha and sixteen of his disciples. Also, the ceiling, beams, and pillars have images of heavenly maidens and flying dragons depicted in brilliant colors. Normally, the inside of the gate is not open to the general public, but when it is opened for special viewings, visitors can see the Shiraki-no-hitsugi (the Plain wood coffins), one of Chion-in’s seven wonders and the glorious adornments in their brilliant colors.
Hōnen was born on the seventh day of the fourth month (lunar calendar) in 1133, which was during the late Heian Period (794-1185). He was born on the Kume Nanjō Inaoka Estate in Mimasaka Province (present-day Okayama Prefecture), and he was the first son of Uruma Tokikuni, the estate’s overseer. Hōnen’s childhood name was Seishimaru. When Seishimaru was nine years old, his father’s residence was the target of a nighttime raid. Tokikuni, who was shot during the surprise attack, left the following testament for Seishimaru from his deathbed: “If you avenge hatred with hatred, there will never be an end to the hatred in the world of men. With a broad heart that has transcended hate, seek out the Buddhist path through which all people are saved.”  Obeying his father’s words, Seishimaru began his studies at the Bodaiji Temple, and at the age of thirteen ascended Mt. Hiei, shaved his head, and received the Buddhist precepts. On Mt. Hiei, he studied the teachings of the Tendai Sect of Buddhism. At first, he went by the name of Enmyō-bō Zenkō, but in the autumn of 1150, at the age of eighteen, he took the name Hōnen-bō Genkū and became a disciple of Jigen-bō Eikū of Kurodani. He was diligent in his studies under Eikū and was praised as “Hōnen-bō the Wisest.” Later, Hōnen would pursue a life of seclusion in search of Buddhist enlightenment.
Hōnen was born on the seventh day of the fourth month (lunar calendar) in 1133, which was during the late Heian Period (794-1185). He was born on the Kume Nanjō Inaoka Estate in Mimasaka Province (present-day Okayama Prefecture), and he was the first son of Uruma Tokikuni, the estate’s overseer. Hōnen’s childhood name was Seishimaru. When Seishimaru was nine years old, his father’s residence was the target of a nighttime raid. Tokikuni, who was shot during the surprise attack, left the following testament for Seishimaru from his deathbed: “If you avenge hatred with hatred, there will never be an end to the hatred in the world of men. With a broad heart that has transcended hate, seek out the Buddhist path through which all people are saved.” Obeying his father’s words, Seishimaru began his studies at the Bodaiji Temple, and at the age of thirteen ascended Mt. Hiei, shaved his head, and received the Buddhist precepts. On Mt. Hiei, he studied the teachings of the Tendai Sect of Buddhism. At first, he went by the name of Enmyō-bō Zenkō, but in the autumn of 1150, at the age of eighteen, he took the name Hōnen-bō Genkū and became a disciple of Jigen-bō Eikū of Kurodani. He was diligent in his studies under Eikū and was praised as “Hōnen-bō the Wisest.” Later, Hōnen would pursue a life of seclusion in search of Buddhist enlightenment.
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Overview
Overview